Kai Murros’ speech

Of the London Forum speeches, the one by ‪Kai Murros I liked the most‬, especially his message for revolutionaries: talk to the farmers; talk to the working class! Blame the academia and the One Ring (materialism). He also speaks favourably of holy rage, something that I absolutely endorse, especially in the forthcoming revolutionary times!

“You will go to the extremes… You will commit those acts without remorse because too much is at stake. England is at stake. All wars and conflicts… will pale in comparison to what is coming. Soon history will be made again in this land… English people will love you… especially when you do the most cruel and horrible things. True love is eventually measured by your ability and your willingness to become a monster, in order to protect those you love. You will do the unthinkable… You will do what cannot be discussed later. What England most desperately needs now is a revolution… And this revolution is long overdue.”

Published in: on October 11, 2015 at 2:28 pm  Comments (1)  

Sebas’ speech

I won’t discuss Sebastian Ronin’s recent speech at London where he, while conceding that the genuine National Socialism “was perfect,” criticizes white nationalism. But since the YouTube comments have been disabled in the London Forum channel (Jez Turner’s forum is for real gentlemen by the way; I visited it last year), let’s host an open thread for all those who agree or disagree with Sebas.



Hieronymus Bosch
Christ Crowned with Thorns ~ 1490-1500
National Gallery, London

Published in: on October 11, 2015 at 9:06 am  Leave a Comment  

Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 9



Sunday, 28th July 1941, evening

Colonisation of the Ukraine—
The soldier-peasants.


We’ll take the southern part of the Ukraine, especially the Crimea, and make it an exclusively German colony.

With the discharge of soldiers after twelve years of service, we shall have thirty to forty thousand men to do what we like with every year. For those of them who are sons of peasants, the Reich will put at their disposal a completely equipped farm.

The soil costs us nothing, we have only the house to build. The peasant’s son will already have paid for it by his twelve years’ service. During the last two years he will already be equipping himself for agriculture. One single condition will be imposed upon him: that he may not marry a townswoman, but a countrywoman who, as far as possible, will not have begun to live in a town with him. These soldier-peasants will be given arms, so that at the slightest danger they can be at their posts when we summon them. That’s how the ancient Austria used to keep its Eastern peoples under control.

Thus we shall again find in the countryside the blessing of numerous families. Where as the present law of rural inheritance dispossesses the younger sons, in future every peasant’s son will be sure of having his patch of ground. And thirty to forty thousand peasants a year—that’s enormous!

In the Baltic States, we’ll be able to accept as colonists some Dutch, some Norwegians—and even, by individual arrangement, some Swedes.

Published in: on October 11, 2015 at 8:49 am  Leave a Comment  

Carrying the cross


Hieronymus Bosch
Christ Carrying the Cross ~ 1515-1516
Museum of Fine Arts in Ghent, Belgium

Published in: on October 4, 2015 at 10:18 am  Comments (3)  

Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 10



Night of 27th-28th July 1941
At the beginning of our movement, I acted above all by intuition. During my imprisonment I had time to provide my philosophy with a natural, historical foundation. From their own point of view, the rulers of the day made a miscalculation in locking me up. They would have been far wiser to let me make speeches all the time, without giving me any respite!

Published in: on October 4, 2015 at 10:03 am  Leave a Comment  

César Tort’s “El Orador”


Before I was born my mother used to practice El Orador (YouTube audio here): a piece for piano composed by my father, the late César Tort.

Throughout her pregnancy I happened to be a couple of inches from the piano’s keys, in embryonic state! My mother once told me that while practicing that piece I moved vigorously in her womb. I have this music amalgamated to my soul…

El Orador (The Orator) is a fantasia for piano that my father composed in 1956 and was performed for the first time by María Teresa Rodríguez, and then by my mother (photo above) in private gatherings after I was born.

Father Vértiz, a Catholic priest with eloquent oratory power had inspired the music of my father. According to my parents, the priest’s sermons were like a parable: they initiated in adages and after crescendos culminated in a violent rhetoric that captivated the faithful.

Published in: on September 30, 2015 at 12:02 am  Comments (9)  
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This 78 x 64 cm. framed illustration in my bedroom is a slightly modified copy drawn by my father in 1957 of Gustave Doré’s illustration of the most famous fratricide in Christendom.

Published in: on September 27, 2015 at 7:48 am  Leave a Comment  
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Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 11



14 August 1941, midday

Plutocracy and the Saxon proletariat—An incredibly stupid bourgeoisie.
There’s nothing astonishing about the fact that Communism had its strongest bastion in Saxony, or that it took us time to win over the Saxon workers to our side. Nor is it astonishing that they are now counted amongst our most loyal supporters. The Saxon bourgeoisie was incredibly narrow-minded. These people insisted that we were mere Communists. Anyone who proclaims the right to social equality for the masses is a Bolshevik! The way in which they exploited the home worker was un- imaginable.

It’s a real crime to have turned the Saxon workers into proletarians. There was a ruling plutocracy in those parts comparable to what still exists to-day in England. Recruiting for the Wehrmacht enabled us to observe the progressive lowering of the quality of the human material in this region. I don’t blame the small man for turning Communist; but I blame the intellectual who did nothing but exploit other people’s poverty for other ends. When one thinks of that riff-raff of a bourgeoisie, even to-day one sees red.

The masses followed the only course possible. The worker took no part in national life. When a monument was unveiled to the memory of Bismarck, or when a ship was launched, no delegation of workers was ever invited—only the frock-coats and uniforms. For me, the top hat is the signature of the bourgeois. When war came, the harm had been done, and it was too late to go into reverse. Moreover, people were too cowardly to crush Social Democracy.

Our pact with Russia never implied that we might be led to adopt a different attitude towards the danger within. Taken by themselves, I find our Communists a thousand times more sympathetic than Starhemberg, say. They were sturdy fellows. Pity they didn’t stay a little longer in Russia. They would have come back completely cured.

Published in: on September 27, 2015 at 7:43 am  Leave a Comment  

César Tort (1925-2015)

César Tort Sr., my father, died tonight at ninety.


junto al padre Mtz

My father in Madrid, Spain with Father Martínez, a teacher of the Madrid Royal Conservatory, a music college (ca. 1949-1950).


con reina Isabel

My father with Queen Elizabeth (1975). This is a low-quality photo because it has been scanned from a newspaper.


Hazme llorar (literally, “Make me cry”) is a piece composed in 1962 by my father for a duet of soprano, contralto and harp. The above is a 2014 performance at the Palace of Fine Arts, a few months before my father’s liver cancer was detected.

Published in: on September 23, 2015 at 9:57 pm  Comments (17)  

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