To the glory of Mammon

 

1

“The Cathedrals were built to the glory of God; New York was built to the glory of Mammon.”

—Kenneth Clark

 

2

(From Francis Parker’s Yockey’s The Enemy of Europe:)

For the purpose of demonstrating with the utmost clarity the elements of the two world-outlooks in this period of Western history between the Second and Third World Wars, a paradigm is appended:

Primacy of the Spirit / Materialism

Will-to-Power / Will-to-Riches

Rank as social distinction / Wealth as social distinction

Society as organism / Society as a collection of individuals

Fulfilment of Duty / “Pursuit of happiness”

Absolute will to biological fertility / Race-suicide, birth control

Hierarchy / Equality

Aristocracy / Plutocracy

Sexual polarity / Feminism

Order / Freedom

Cultivation of soldierly virtues / Cult of bourgeois virtues

Eroticism as legitimate source of joy and fertility / Eroticism as vice, the cult of immorality

Affirmation of War and Conquest / Pacifism, preparation of the coloured populations for “self-government”

Western Man in the service of a great Mission / Man as a Machine

Art practiced in conformity with the Cultural task / “L’art pour l’art”

Politico-military expansion / Financial-military-economic expansion


3

(From an article by Frances Fowle:)

George Frederic Watts, in common with such social commentators as William Morris, Ruskin and Carlyle, began to question the benefits and purpose of modern industry and commerce and their dehumanizing effects. In 1880 he wrote, “Material prosperity has become our real god, but we are surprised to find that the worship of this visible deity does not make us happy.” (G.F. Watts, “The Present Conditions of Art”). Four years later he decided to personify this so-called deity—the evil “Mammon”—in paint.

mammon-george-frederick-watts

The picture is nearly life-size and the seated figure against a curtained backdrop calls to mind the portraits of Titian. However, instead of an established figure or celebrated beauty, Watts depicts an object of revulsion, seated on a throne decorated with skulls. Just behind the curtained background we are offered a glimpse, not of a peaceful landscape, but of fire and destruction. The picture is painted in a rich, almost hellish palette of red, gold and black. Watts visualizes Mammon as a brutish despot: an ugly, lumpen figure seated on his throne, nursing his moneybags on his lap. The ogre brushes aside a beautiful girl with one hand, and crushes a young man under foot. Both are symbols of youth, innocence and beauty; yet, naked and vulnerable, they are also lifeless and inert. Mammon sits in glory with his “gorgeous but ill-fitting golden draperies, which fall awkwardly about his coarse limbs” (M.H. Spielmann, “The Works of Mr. George F. Watts, R.A., with a Complete Catalogue of his Pictures,” Pall Mall Gazette, 1886, p. 21). In the oil study (Watts Gallery, Compton), Watts also gives Mammon a bandaged, gouty foot, a symptom of his indulgent and excessive lifestyle.

Mammon’s crown, with its upended gold coins and ass’s ears, symbolizes Mammon’s ignorance and stupidity, but also links him with Ovid’s King Midas, whose touch turned everything to gold and to whom Apollo gave ass’s ears because he did not respond to the music of the lyre. The best-known literary reference to Mammon occurs in Spencer’s Faerie Queene, book II, canto 7. Spencer describes Mammon as tanned by soot from the blacksmith’s forge, a detail that perhaps accounts for the smoke on the right hand side of the painting.

The subtitle of the picture—Dedicated to his Worshippers—is like an inscription on a monument. Watts apparently had plans to commission a sculpture of Mammon which would be set up in Hyde Park and “where he hoped his worshippers would be at least honest enough to bow the knee publicly to him.”

Published in: on November 1, 2013 at 9:11 pm  Comments (5)  
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5 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Reblogged this on vikingbitch's Blog and commented:

    When I see this picture, I think about how people of European descent across the world have been commodified…

  2. In 1880 he (G.F. Watts) wrote, “Material prosperity has become our real god, but we are surprised to find that the worship of this visible deity does not make us happy.”

  3. This image reminds me of the Tri-State area (i.e. New York, Connecticut, & New Jersey) as the American centres of sloth.

  4. Reblogged this on ELLIOT LAKE News.

  5. You forgot to mention industrialization and machines in the analysis of the modern age. 1800ds, whites were used as rigour slaves in cotton and coal factories. White families slept at 5 in a room in the city, with cockroaches, all of them working hard for rent and without lightbulbs, muck streets of brick houses.


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