On Norman Rockwell

by Brad Griffin

 
Fifty years after he first started doing work for the magazine, Norman Rockwell was tired of doing the same sweet views of America for the Saturday Evening Post in the early 1960s. The great illustrator was increasingly influenced by his close friends and loved ones to look at some of the problems that was afflicting American society. Rockwell had formed close friendships with Erik Erickson and Robert Coles, psychiatrists specializing in the treatment of children and both were advocates of the civil rights movement.

His most profound influence was his third wife, Mary L. “Molly” Punderson, who was an ardent liberal and who urged him in new directions. On December 14, 1963, Rockwell did his last cover for the Saturday Evening Post and he began working for Look magazine. Look magazine finally gave Norman Rockwell the opportunity to express his social concerns.

Rockwell’s first painting was The Problem We All Live With, one of his greatest paintings.

rockwellThis painting depicts Ruby Bridges, the little girl who integrated the New Orleans school system in 1960, being escorted to her class by federal marshals in the face of hostile crowds. It’s a simple picture, the disembodied figures of four stiff suited men and the vulnerable yet defiant figure of a school age African American girl marching lockstep. To the right is a tomato staining a wall, obviously thrown at the girl but just missing. My eyes focus on the girl and her immaculate white, a contrast to the graffiti stained wall in the background. As a painting it’s a wonder with its composition conveying Rockwell’s message in a few simple figures.

nr-2An even greater departure from Rockwell’s usual sweet America paintings is Southern Justice, painted in 1963. Rockwell did a finished painting, but the editors published Rockwell’s color study instead, and I think his color study conveys the terror of the scene more successfully.

It depicts the deaths of three Civil Rights workers who were killed for their efforts to register African American voters. It is done in a monochrome sienna color, and it is a horrifying vision of racism. A look of it can be seen here.

Rockwell’s most optimistic view of the civil rights movement was Negro in the Suburbs, painted in 1967 [see it here]. It depicts an African American family moving into a white suburban neighborhood. The African American children look over by the kids in the neighborhood, with all the children sharing a love of baseball, America’s game.

In that painting, Norman Rockwell depicts an ideal, all-American, high trust, happily integrated neighborhood, which is the polar opposite of the integrated neighborhoods that actually exist.

You could turn on CNN or The Weather Channel or watch any movie in Black Run America (BRA) and you will find the same sort of disingenuous nonsense that Norman Rockwell was peddling in the 1960s.

Published in: on March 26, 2015 at 9:43 am  Comments (2)  

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Griffin said that on VNN forum. Alex Linder commented in his exchange with Griffin: “All I see is how easily Christian motifs of the sliced savior turn into ‘civil rights’ morality plays and paintings.”

  2. Norman Rockwell was born in NYC in 1894. He died in MA in 1978. His actual life experiences were that of a hothouse flower. He lived in a protected Yankee Puritan Anglo Saxon ideological bubble his ENTIRE life—like millions of other White No REAL Contact With the Darling Dark Pets “Liberals”.

    Were he alive today—I’d stalk and harass him and DEMAND he do a painting of Little Baby Antonio West, in the last moment of his life, or Kitty Genovese, in the last moments of hers, or that last moment before Darren Wilson decided to and was able to save his own life, and not become a Blood Sacrifice to the Dark Gods of Gentle Giant Mikey Brown.


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