Superficial thumbs up

During the fourth century as divisions and sects grew, the schisms and the heresies developed with increasing boldness. The anti-heretic shouting also became more strident, more aggressive. At the same time, the struggle against non-Catholics sought judicial support. It was time of agitation and almost pathological actions: a true ‘spiritual disease’ [my emphasis].

This quotation from my last excerpts of Deschner’s book gives an idea why I reproduce chapters of the Julian novel on Sundays. Also, if we reread the italicised sentence it is impossible not to see the analogies with our times.

As I see it, the West has suffered two great psychotic breakdowns in history: the first in the 3rd and 4th centuries that resulted in the conquest of the Roman Empire by a cult of Levantine extraction (as we shall see in Deschner’s chapters on Constantine), and what has been happening in the West in the 20th and 21st centuries.

For white nationalists it is easy to see the descending spiral of a spiritual disease that destroys their race today. (Just take a look at Tucker at Fox News: not every interviewee is a kike: there are ethnosuicidal whites as well.) But few have notion of the first psychotic breakdown that suffered the fair race in the centuries in which Christianity was born. And this, despite that much earlier than Deschner, Edward Gibbon also blamed Christianity in his magnum opus.

Recall these passages from the introduction to Criminal History of Christianity, quoted in The Fair Race’s Darkest Hour:

The magnificent temples of worship of antiquity were destroyed almost everywhere: irreplaceable value buildings burned or demolished, especially in Rome itself, where the ruins of the temples served as quarries. In the tenth century they still engaged in breaking down statues, architraves, burning paintings, and the most beautiful sarcophagi served as bathtubs or feeders for pigs.

But the most tremendous destruction, barely imaginable, was caused in the field of education. Gregory I, the Great, the only doctor Pope of the Church in addition to Leo I, according to tradition burned a large library that existed on the Palatine. The flourishing book trade of antiquity disappeared; the activity of the monasteries was purely receptive. Three hundred years after the death of Alcuin and Rabanus Maurus, the disciples were still studying with manuals written by them. Even St. Thomas Aquinas, the Church’s official philosopher, writes that ‘the desire for knowledge is a sin when it does not serve the knowledge of God.’

In universities, the Aristotelian hypertrophy aborted any possibility of independent research. To the dictation of theology were subject philosophy and literature. History, as a science, was completely unknown. The experimentation and inductive research was condemned; experimental sciences were drowned by the Bible and dogma; scientists thrown into the dungeons, or sent to the stake. In 1163, Pope Alexander III (remember in passing that at that time there were four anti-popes) forbade all clerics studying physics. In 1380 a decision of the French parliament forbade the study of chemistry, referring to a decree of Pope John XXII.

And while in the Arab world (obedient to Muhammad’s slogan: ‘The ink of scholars is more sacred than the blood of martyrs’) the sciences flourished, especially medicine, in the Catholic world the bases of scientific knowledge remained unchanged for more than a millennium, well into the sixteenth century. The sick were supposed to seek comfort in prayer instead of medical attention. The Church forbade the dissection of corpses, and sometimes even rejected the use of natural medicines for considering it unlawful intervention with the divine. In the Middle Ages not even the abbeys had doctors, not even the largest. In 1564 the Inquisition condemned to death the physician Andreas Vesalius, the founder of modern anatomy, for opening a corpse and for saying that man is not short of a rib that was created for Eve.

Consistent with the guidance of teaching, we find another institution, ecclesiastical censure, very often (at least since the time of St. Paul in Ephesus) dedicated to the burning of the books of pagans and the destruction (or prohibition) of rival Christian literature, from the books of the Arians and Nestorians until those of Luther. But let us not forget that Protestants sometimes also introduced censorship, even for funeral sermons and also for non-theological works, provided they touched on ecclesiastical matters or religious customs.

However self-destructive it may have been for whites to empower a Levantine cult in Imperial Rome, at least Christianity had not a focused agenda to exterminate whites. The second psychotic breakdown, which we see developing in our days, is more vicious. Unless a racial revolution takes over it would no longer be possible to recover—as in the Renaissance—because the purpose now is to destroy Aryan DNA through miscegenation. Alas, there’s no revolution on the horizon, so we need to delve deeper into history to understand the West’s darkest hour.

Those thumbs up that I receive on my Facebook page for Siege links I don’t receive on Kriminalgeschichte—they’re superficial thumbs up. I wonder if their authors are able to see that, after a life dedicated to National Socialism, Christianity corrupted the mind of the author of Siege into going astray mystically. We can only imagine the revolutionary movement that Mason could have inspired in the US had he remained focused on racial matters.

Published in: on October 10, 2017 at 6:13 pm  Comments Off on Superficial thumbs up  
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