Andrei Rublev

As in my central article this day I mention Andrei Rublev, as an introduction I would like to quote the words of a young YouTube film critic: ‘…Andrei’s personal struggle and what he eventually learns. Andrei loses his faith not in God, but in man, and in rejecting man, he is without an audience. He has no voice, no one to communicate to. His [vow of] silence is more than literal. Without empathy for those he minsters to, he cannot effectively minister’.
 

Saturday postscript:

Yesterday I saw, once again, the prologue of Andrei Rublev, the hot air balloon ride, and the first part that film, ‘The Jester’: scenes located in the year 1400 (tonight I’ll probably continue to watch other parts).

When I turned on the television, before, I got to see a few moments of Batman v Superman and a thought occurred to me that could perfectly cover a much longer article, but here I will try to summarise it.

When I was a child in the 1960s I saw TV series like Daniel Boone and Custer. Alas, Jerry Siegel, born in Ohio to a Jewish family, inaugurated a new genre by creating the fictional superhero Superman: a genre that seeped through the decades, including Adventures of Superman that I also used to watch as a child.

Historical figures Boone and Custer would be equivalent, on American soil, to the message of Rublev on Russian soil; with the difference that Russia, as a nation, is much older than the US and therefore has much deeper roots. Regardless of whether the US is a young nation, the Jew Siegel inaugurated a super-toxic genre that injured American consciousness about epics such as the conflict with the Indians in Boone and Custer: the realistic heroes before the ‘superheroes’ multiplied among fans. (Now you see that many YouTubers show hundreds of plastic miniatures of such ‘superheroes’ as the background of their shows!)

As I said, this could be the basis for writing a longer article. But the contrast between those minutes that I came to see of the toxic Batman v Superman and, immediately afterwards, the Russian film cannot better describe what I want to convey. I mean the corruption of the mentality of the American people from the Jewish quarter and, let’s face it, from the Americans themselves who swallowed the terrible poison that the ‘superheroes’ has represented to replace the heroes of their real history, such as Boone and Custer.

Using my words, and pace Trevor Lynch (Greg Johnson), the priest of the 14 words should never watch poisonous pop culture but movies depicting flesh and blood men, like Rublev.

Published in: on November 15, 2019 at 11:07 am  Comments (4)  

4 Comments

  1. ‘Andrey Rublyov’ is one of the 15 greatest European films, and by far the greatest film of Tarkovsky (his other films I don’t even like). I’ve watched it only once in a theatre (now closed) a few years ago, but I remember it very clearly with all its outward epicness.

    Don’t know if you are aware, but Das Schwarze Korps, the weekly newspaper of the SS, published these articles attacking Americanism (and this Siegel clown) during WW2:
    Link

    Link

    • Excellent articles! I’d like to quote from your first link:

      Jerry [Siegel] looked about the world and saw things happening in the distance, some of which alarmed him. He heard of Germany’s reawakening, of Italy’s revival, in short of a resurgence of the manly virtues of Rome and Greece. “That’s fine,” thought Jerry, and decided to import the idea of manly virtue and spread them among young Americans. Thus was born this Superman

      But white nationalists who watch TV continue drinking this Kool-Aid! (see Kevin Alfred Strom’s recent article about TV).

  2. Ditto. I believe, what you are sensing is what I call the loss of reverence for death. Modern man has no experience with death and thus is frivolous and childish. The only living philosophies that still retain that zeal and tragedy are the likes of Shia Islam or North Korea.

    My favourite film is Jud Süß (1940). It shows how the Aryan problem begets and encompasses the Jewish problem, and has an incredibly severe bittersweet ending.

    Kolberg (1945) features a glorious song with the common people’s marching on screen because the entire nation has risen to war. You can watch it on YouTube, Das Volk Steht Auf. “and the sun, cold and bloody, is lighting our bloody banners”, “in the next few ours, the fate of the world will be decided”…

  3. Its incredibly how similar Jewish-made characters are. Superman as “the conqueror of death” with all his incredible powers is just another Yeshua who is also supposed to be a “conqueror of death” hence the Mashiach title. Its unfortunate how few notice the similarities.


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