The wall

With the average white nationalist, I have run into a wall on issues such as Pierce and Kemp’s stories of the white race (the basis for understanding everything), why many anti-Semites continue to worship the god of the Jews, conspiracy theories like JFK and 911, or scepticism about a currency crisis due to the Fed panicking through QE4 (a process that apparently has started these pandemic days). The cause of the mental wall is succinctly explained by the American philosopher Peter Boghossian:

People do not formulate their beliefs on the basis of evidence. They think they do, but instead, they cherry pick pieces of information or pieces of data to support the beliefs they already have.

The key thing to understand is that people formulate their beliefs because of some moral impulse, derived from a community to which they belong. They have a strong moral sense of why they ought to believe something.

Arguing with evidence doesn’t work. That triggers something called the backfire effect—it’s well established in the literature—where people just hunker down or double down in their beliefs.

So instead of providing evidence, there are other ways that we have to shift those conversations.

The way to reach people about these issues is through values and not evidence. You have to figure out what somebody values and why they value it. In fancy terms, that’s called moral epistemology.

Once you figure out someone’s moral epistemology, that’s like the lock. And the templates that we use in the book [How to Have Impossible Conversations] are like keys to unlock that lock. Epistemology is just a two dollar word for ‘how you know what you think you know’. And morality is just a word meaning ‘what ought I to do’.

People don’t really think very much about how they come to their moral beliefs. It’s remarkably interesting how brittle those moral epistemologies are. With a few targeted questions, people can become more reflective about that.

Fortunately, there are a few nationalists who live on the other side of the wall.

Published in: on March 13, 2020 at 12:01 am  Comments (5)  

5 Comments

  1. In other words, “I believe this is true, but I have no reason to believe so. I just wish it were true, so I believe it”.

    • “In other words, ‘I believe this is true, but I have no reason to believe so. I just wish it were true, so I believe it.'”

      No one is immune to this. Belief’s can easily become self-fulfilling prophecy’s; the unconscious works to “prove” our beliefs true to ourselves, generally speaking. It’s why a true scientist will never say “…’settled’ science…”

      I just wish to comment a comment celebrating seeing our enemies finally suffer, & hopefully — finally find themselves under some sort of threat (thanks to Covid-19’s contributions).

      Here’s to hoping it proves a true opportunity for any & all Aryan men of noble feelings to step up.

      In spite of my efforts limiting my exposure around other ppl & wearing masks when I have exposed myself, I think I am infected with the corona virus myself. I first noted a deep soreness of my throat a couple of days ago, and I’ve had a godawful headache + body-driven & oriented general lethargy since then. Haven’t had any coughing or sneezing though, which makes me a little doubtful.

      If i am correct about being infected and I wind up becoming seriously ill, well…welp, I’ll leave that at that. It seems like Trump probably has the virus along with much of the shill puppets, the ruling class.

      Hopefully this does lead to a full on economic collapse and create a decisive opportunity. Hopefully better & stronger Aryan men arise. Hopefully they act & act decisively. “they”…

      • Exactly my attitude. In December I got a very terrible flu, and another one in January. I even had to go to the Emergency Room of a respiratory disease hospital. All the money I had in the bank was spent on doctors and therapies. Trouble is, because I broke my nose as a teenager (part of the tragedy about which I’m so mad…), I am very prone to flues: so I’m at risk of dying this year, although I am happier than scared because the window of opportunity will be opened.

  2. You can’t obtain an Aryan resurgence via Semitic soteriology. White Nationalist Christians (and American Republican Neoconservatives) are invested into a spiritual Stockholm Syndrome with their demiurgic captor YHWH and his peasant son Yeshua.

    I think this has a lot to due with the “Fear of God” (Fear of YHWH/El) and the fear of perdition despite being “redpilled” (but not swallowing it whole). The Aryan psyche has to be relieved of its fetters from Semitic superstition and lore.

    • I wholeheartedly agree.

      But to tie it up to the concept og epistemology and having ‘impossible conversations’ I sometimes apply the question of: How do you want the world to be in 200 years?

      If they are not downright destructive, they will come up with a description of man as being stronger, mentally more fit and spiritual more advanced. This will require that the best among us must partake in breeding at the expense of the weaker/less abled among us.

      I just leave it at that. They have agreed upon a development that so thoroughly contradict the pitiful meekness required by yhwh/el slave mentality, that I leave them to ponder on it. If I follow up too much on it, they turn and become irrationally defensive about their childhood indoctrination.


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