Slaves of parental introjects

Yesterday I wrote that many people who want to do something for the white race cannot do it because they continue to be slaves of their parental introjects. But not only yesterday. On this site I have used the term ‘parental introject’ many times. And on my stats page I’ve noticed that several visitors try to understand its meaning when I link the word to Wikipedia. But the best way to explain it is simply by anecdote.

Professor of psychology Nicholas Humphrey does not usually use the term introject. But by 1997, when I had already abandoned my belief in parapsychology, I was still reading on the sceptics of the paranormal. At Barnes & Noble in Houston I sat down to read some passages of Humphrey’s Leaps of Faith, and on page 147 I had a eureka moment. On that page we can read:

Imagine that in childhood, before you thought of questioning it, you were told as a fact that Jesus performed miracles and therefore was the son of God, and not till later in life did it occur to you that the miracles might not be genuine. By that time, you might well find that your critical faculties had already been hijacked. For how could you possibly entertain such doubts about the works of a man whose works had already proved he was never to be doubted! The importance of the first step taken in childhood was not lost on the Jesuits: ‘If I have the teaching of children up to seven years of age or thereabouts, I care not who has them afterwards, they are mine for life.’

Above, Humphrey as a boy. It was after that passage, on that same page, that the author added a phrase that caused my eureka moment. Keep in mind that his book is a critique of parapsychology. Humphrey said that even when an alleged psychic is shown to resort to fraud, because of the image implanted on us about Jesus, the damage had been done in the believer’s mind.

When I read those words my mind immediately flew to the introject that my father had put in me as a child about Jesus’ miracles, an introject secularised by parapsychologists with their beliefs in extrasensory perception and psychokinesis among humans. So to understand the word introject, we just have to think about Humphrey’s quote from the Jesuits above, ‘If I have the teaching of children up to seven years of age or thereabouts, I care not who has them afterwards, they are mine for life’.

That’s it! Once you have a specific malware programmed in your soul at a tender age it is incredibly difficult to remove it.

Leaps of Faith can be read online, but I suggest obtaining a copy because it is one of those books that should be in our bookshelves. It explains why so many people still cling, like children seeking reassurance, to belief in supernatural phenomena like an immortal soul and life after death. It is also a devastating critique of the existing evidence for paranormal phenomena, ranging from miracles to the laboratory experiments for extrasensory perception.

No matter what the evidence, those who have not fulfilled Delphi’s commandment will continue to believe that ‘there must be something there’. They’re slaves of parental introjects.

Published in: on April 1, 2020 at 11:11 am  Comments (4)  

4 Comments

  1. I think it was the Irish poet George Bernhard Shaw who once said:
    “Two percent of the population think, three percent like to give the impression that they think. The remaining 95 percent will do almost anything to avoid thinking at all”.

    And those last 95 percent are the ones the indoctrinators manage to keep i chains for life.

    I was also exposed to christian indoctrination as a child, certainly not as severely as you, but nevertheless. I have completely disregarded the whole concept, but it took a bit of conscious deprogramming. Sadly enough, as I get older, some of mye friends starts to orientate themselves towards that bogus story again after decades of seemingly indifference. They are starting to search for a meaning with the afterlife, and it is so easy to fall back to childhood indoctrinations.

    Whether i qualify as the 2-percentile or the 3-percentile mentioned above I will have to leave to others to judge ;-).

    • “Sadly enough, as I get older, some of my friends start to orientate themselves towards that bogus story again after decades of seemingly indifference. They are starting to search for a meaning with the afterlife, and it is so easy to fall back to childhood indoctrinations.”

      A comrade of mine has dubbed this “lazy Christian drift” and it was one of the first signs that the alt-right was going down.

  2. Thank your sharing this wisdom and phrase, CT. It’s about time we had a phrase for this phenomenon. Just having an accurate, clinical descriptor is an important first step in excising something implanted at birth in so many of us.

    • Indeed. In my autobiography I call it ‘war against the introjects’.


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