Lunatic commenters at CC

I have only thoroughly studied one conspiracy theory, the so-called Satanic Ritual Abuse: a moral panic that swept through English-speaking countries in the early 1990s and put innocent people in jail for incredible crimes. When I used to comment on child abuse forums, I found it disturbing that one of my closest colleagues believed such lunacies.

If someone were to read my autobiographical series, he would realise that it is an odyssey of the spirit. Having been born into a Catholic family I passed into an amorphous Christianity as a teenager, and after a family tragedy I fell into a neo-Christian sect that I abandoned after a few years only to surrender my worldview to the paranormal. After reading the sceptics (of which Nicholas Humphrey was only one of them) I began to see the tremendous damage that the religion of my parents had represented in my young mentality. A series of autobiographical books that I started at the age of twenty-nine, and that ended at sixty-one, made me see the world as that old man entwined in the roots of a tree who has been living in the past, as in the fiction of George R.R. Martin.

I said that the sceptics of the paranormal helped me out of a cognitive swamp. But a good percentage of racially conscious whites have not delved into the labyrinths of their own being and their past, at least not at the level of the mummified old man. One way to start doing it is to adhere to the most elementary common sense. If you’ve read conspiracy books about the JFK murder, for example, it’s time to listen to the prosecutor who refutes them—not to leave the courtroom as I have so often complained! The same can be said about the 9/11 attacks and so much conspiracy theory that many racially conscious whites believe religiously, including those who make wild hypotheses about the covid-19.

In The Return of Quetzalcoatl (translated in Day of Wrath) I present in the most didactic way possible the concept of paleologic thought: an antediluvian form, so to speak, of human cognition as opposed to the Aristotelian logic that should govern our intellects. One way to spot who is using paleologic forms of cognition is to simply find out how much that person can tolerate cognitive dissonance; for example, how much can a believer that Oswald didn’t act alone face Bugliosi’s book. The sad truth about the racialist community is that many are not thinking logically, as are totally unable to listen to the other voice. And they are incapable because, psychogenically, they are more immature than the three-eyed crow.

I am not asking you to read my books. But if you could at least begin to familiarise yourself with the most hilarious literature of logical writers (*), a gigantic step towards the repudiation of conspiracy theories would be taken.

In the case of the covid-19, even though Hunter Wallace has been promoting the very logical videos by Chris Martenson, several commenters still come up with lunatic theories. I bet they haven’t even watched some of Martenson’s videos about the virus. As I have already said, I’ve noted similar behaviour in Kevin MacDonald’s webzine commentariat. And now I find out that some commenters also say crazy things about the Chinese virus in Counter-Currents to which Greg Johnson recently replied:

Responding to lunatic commenter #1: I see no credible evidence that the virus is not a serious threat. And connecting it with 5G? That strikes me a simple lunacy.

Responding to lunatic commenter #2: When there’s a global crisis, there are plenty of leftist and globalist megalomaniacs who will try to exploit it for their aims. Bill Gates and Henry Kissinger being two prominent examples. But that is no excuse for paranoid ideation from the conspiratard community, which just taints reasonable attempts to block bad policies.

Responding to lunatic commenter #3: This is precisely the form of Right-wing denialism that I reject as false and harmful.

Responding to lunatic commenter #4: This is the sort of Right-wing denialism that I completely reject. I have not changed my mind on it at all.

Responding to lunatic commenter #5: You are completely wrong about this, and so is [Andrew] Anglin.

By the way, in his article today, Hunter Wallace says: ‘The conspiracies are getting more complex. If you don’t believe in the conspiracy, then you must be part of the conspiracy’. He’s referring to the hard-right WN truthers of course.

When I was in the process of disabusing myself, this was precisely what I had encountered in other conspiracy theories, not just Satanic Ritual Abuse (SRA) but at a 1994 conference where I listened to the UFO sceptic Phil Klass. SRA or UFO theorists are so incapable of tolerating the idea that you can honestly disagree with them, that they have no choice but to think that the sceptic is part of a sinister conspiracy.

But Wallace hasn’t studied conspiracy theories from the POV of paleologism. He even says that NY alone has more covid-19 cases than any country. If he paid attention to the Martenson videos he advertises, he would know that the Chinese statistics are propagandistic: commie stats that under no circumstances should be trusted.

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(*) Among all the sceptics who helped me heal from paleologic thinking, Martin Gardner’s articles in The Skeptical Inquirer were a real treat from a literary point of view. It’s amazing how they make you laugh! Whoever wants to get started in the mysteries of the three-eyed raven’s cave would do well to add the following books by Gardner to his bookshelf: Science: Good, Bad, and Bogus (1981), The New Age: Notes of a Fringe Watcher (1988), On the Wild Side: The Big Bang, ESP, the Beast 666, Levitation, Rainmaking, Trance-Channeling, Seances and Ghosts, and More… (1992).

Published in: on April 10, 2020 at 3:00 pm  Comments (17)  

17 Comments

  1. This anti-racist guy, who lived 14 years in China, speaks fluent mandarin and has a mixed Chinese daughter. But he’s far more insightful than naive westerners who believe in Chinese stats, e.g., that China has less infected people of covid-19 than any other country.

    Conversely, I find it hilarious that China is expelling niggers from China. If only the West followed China’s lead…

  2. Not to forget my personal hated group of crazies: Revelation-centered doomsayers. They are almost as bad as flat earthers yet much more common. Anyone familiar with all the liars that claim the end times are coming and all the fools that follow them should keep this type of lunatic in mind when debunking Xtianity.
    Nearly as bad but no where near as common are Nostradamus cults. The fact that obscure French babbles could be regarded as anything more than that is a good indication that most people are susceptible to some kind of superstition without even realizing it.

  3. Ceasar,

    Many believers in this stuff like UFOs or Satanic Cults or 9/11 conspiracies cite Wikileaks as a source for why it is true. At least, the more “sane” and well-read ones do. Wikileaks has and always had a good track record in leaking information, as the logic goes for them.

    Not to present a loaded question, but what reason would you have to believe that Wikileaks, an otherwise well-trusted source of leaked government information, would be lying about these things?

    • No sane person believes in SRA or UFOs as ET visitors. Do you?

      And the SRA and UFO mania has almost vanished since I was young, times when Wikileaks didn’t even exist. When Martin Gardner published most of his books there was not even internet. But people still believed in tutti frutti.

      • I don’t, however the fact that these things have been supposedly “confirmed” by Wikileaks certainly makes me ask questions. I guess my question is why would Wikileaks, an otherwise trustworthy source, make up something so outlandish and crazy? That is certainly a more reasonable question than “Do aliens/UFOs exist?”

      • UFOs exist: there are plenty of unidentified flying objects. Aliens may exist in the universe. What is crazy is to believe that they’re already here. I don’t read Wikileaks. If they say we are already visited by extra-terrestrials, where’s the evidence of that claim? As far as I know, there is none.

  4. Did the berserkers of yore use the Aristotelian logic when they were tearing man’s flesh?

    I could end it here, laconically. But I may continue. You, CT, seem to have quite a lot of unthinkable taboos, too. What if science proved life according to the Four Words impossible? You would commit collective suicide then, obviously. “Despise humanity”, and all that jazz. But suicide is never an option for an atheist animal.

    And another point. What is your opinion on the neo-Nazis such as Carolyn Yeager from Unz Review? I’ve noticed they are trying to make Hitler out to be a passive, peace-loving Christian, and are saying that WW2 was started not by Hitler, but by evil Poles, Anglos, Jews, (aliens?) you name it. Seems insane to me. I have always respected you, CT, for venerating Heinrich Himmler’s thirst for Jewish blood.

    (Although Savitri Devi said a NS should function like an emotionless automaton according to the Bhagavad-Gita, not taking any pleasure in the killing…)

    • Several questions in a single comment? I’ll answer only one.

      It is possible to be scientific and still fulfill the 4 words. Read Arthur Clark’s first novel, Against the Fall of Night (later expanded as The City and the Stars), mentioned in my 10th book.

    • I thought Yeager thinks Hitler wasn’t Christian?

      • Obviously, this is my conjecture, my understanding. Unz and Yeager’s defence of Hitler seems Christian to me through and through – how his hand was forced to attack that dastardly “artificial” Poland by evil FDR and Jews. They are afraid to look the truth in the eyes – that Hitler was a vicious, bloodthirsty beast; that this is some of the ways to combat Christianity, by unapologetic murder.

        His failure did not bring upon us this degeneracy. The West was already rotting, its days numbered. The berserker rage of Germania was a decent attempt from a particular group of Aryans of the Prussian tradition. But where have the others gone? Where are the Anglos, and the French, and the Swedes? All turned to husks.

      • My thoughts exactly about Arthur Kemp’s preface to Ostara Edition’s Hitler’s Table Talk. He tried to downplay Hitler’s legit thirst of conquest and, though Kemp is not a Christian, like Yeager he tries to invent a neochristian Hitler that is more sensitive to the Slavs’ feelings.

        Today I added to the sidebar the image of another edition of Hitler’s Table Talk, which is far worse than Kemp’s. I used it only because Roper’s cover of the book is red, and Kemp’s is blue, which doesn’t combine with this site’s background! But the preface of Hugh Trevor-Roper is absolute BS.

  5. I do in this case, as in any other case, ask myself:
    Cui Bono?
    And then – is this all a coincidence based on nature throwing dices, or are there parties manipulating here?
    I never leave it past those who live by Machiavelli to try to manipulate absolutely everything, even logic. In the end the only important thing is keeping the vast majority in a indoctrinated perception of reality and keep them antagonistic towards any one who questions it.
    We are up against a lot more than lack of logic. One (obviously) being control and manipulation of information.

    • Cui bono doesn’t apply to the Spanish flu or the black plague: those were natural accidents.

  6. You’ve mentioned SRA in a book of your’s I believe. Are there any decent books on the subject?

    • Probably, but unfortunately the one I own was authored by an academic Jew (Frankfurter, D., 2006. Evil Incarnate: Rumors of Demonic Conspiracy and Ritual Abuse in History. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press).

      I do recommend, however, the Wikipedia article on SRA and especially the film Indictment: The McMartin Trial.

      • That title lost me, thank you for reminding me of it. It must be the best available resource we have at the moment. Does the text reference the Brandi Blackbear case? That case shows how ridiculous American neo-Puritans are, and how the Satanic Panic extended into the 21st century.

      • Maybe Brandi Blackbear is not mentioned there. I liked some articles that The Skeptical Inquirer published about SRA long time ago. But again, the movie Indictment shows how ridiculous American neo-Puritans are, as you said.


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