Negrolatry’s religious roots

Left, image of carpetbagger scene in Gone with the Wind, a war that occurred at a time when there was no mass media owned by Jewry, no kike educational establishment, and before mass immigration of Jews even began.

There are polls on Twitter asking what is the cause of the negrolatry with options to answer but no option mentions Christianity. But yesterday there was an exchange in Unz Review that throws light on the subject:

Mark Tapley said: You always drag Christianity into everything…

Robert Morgan replied: Understanding that Christianity is the origin of white people’s delusion of racial equality is essential. It doesn’t require me to “drag in” anything. Anyone who has an understanding of the history of the nineteenth century in America will understand the importance of the Christian fanaticism that characterized it. Of course, that obviously doesn’t include either you or your buddy Johnny. These religious revivals, known as the “Great Awakenings”, were closely bound up with abolitionism.

The white people today who are getting on their knees in front of negroes and literally licking their boots are the spiritual heirs of these Christian fanatics, whether they know it or not.

Mark Tapley said: None of the northern troops would have fought to free black people that they cared nothing about one way or the other. Christianity was not a factor or an influence on the War.

Robert Morgan replied: This is just wrong, whether you are speaking from ignorance (most likely) or are just lying. America was an intensely Christian nation at the time, and slavery had been a hotly contested issue from the founding of the country on up to the outbreak of war over it in 1861. There had always been a deep strain of Christianity-inspired anti-racism that characterized its political life, and it continues today. In fact, five of the thirteen original states in early America had already granted citizenship and the vote to negroes.

There’s quite a bit of interesting history involved with this discussed at considerable length in the Dred Scott case from 1856.

3 Comments

  1. In Cotton Mather’s [infamous for his involvement in the illegitimate Salem witch trials from 1692-1693] The Negro Christianized. An Essay to Excite and Assist that Good Work, the Instruction of Negro-Servants in Christianity (1706), Mather’s states: “Man, Thy Negro is thy Neighbour. … Yea, if thou dost grant, That God hath made of one Blood, all Nations of men, he is thy Brother too.” The editor notes Mather’s language as both particularly fresh and almost contemporary.

    Publishers Weekly notes in their review of Jefferson Davis: The Essential Writings (Modern Library) that “Davis paints slavery as a benevolent paternalism that spreads Christianity”.

    Americanism (via John Winthrop’s “city upon a hill”) is the conclusion of the “New Jerusalem” of St. John of Patmos’ Revelations.

    Even slavery itself and the catholic rhetoric used to defend slavery was a predecessor to the Civil Rights movement.

    • But authors (such as Andrew Joyce) and conservative commenters of The Occidental Observer, while mentioning Xtianity in an article mentioning Negrolatry, are still in denial.

      By the way, your first paragraph is so interesting that it merits an entry of its own.

      • I appreciate the article in apropos to Cotton Mather. My aforementioned citations corroborate Savitri Devi’s claim that (paraphrasing) slavery ebbs the Master in the long-run. I believe this was in her autobiography (And Time Rolls On).


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