Blaming mankind

On this site I have quoted a lot from Robert Morgan. Although he’s right about Christianity, Morgan seems to be saying that technology was something like the apple of knowledge that men ate and were expelled from paradise. That vision of man presupposes the Golden Age of humanity, which for some reason was corrupted in the Bronze Age and eventually in the Iron Age: a myth.

Morgan’s mistake, blaming technology for everything, is due to his lack of knowledge of my appropriation of psychohistory, as massive child sacrifice in pre-technological civilisation speaks horrors of humanity. (In our time there is almost no ritual sacrifice of children, but society allows parents to mistreat their children’s egos to the extent of schizophrenizing them.)

Morgan’s position reminds me of Marxists who blame capitalism, as if before capitalism there had been no horrors in the world (see for example what I say about schizophrenia and pre-Columbian Amerinds in Day of Wrath). The only thing technology does is empower even more a modified ape that does very bad things for the reasons outlined in my book: the ‘long childhood’ that lends itself to all kinds of parental abuse, traumas and a pandemonium of cruelty and severe mental disorders. However, under another pseudonym Morgan used to comment here without reading Day of Wrath where I explain psychohistory.

The trick is not only to blame capitalism, Jewry, technological civilisation or even Christianity but man himself or rather what I call ‘exterminable Neanderthals’. And only the Aryan race has the potential to leave human Neanderthalism behind.

When Morgan commented here, to rebut his technological reductionism (‘Eve’s apple’) I pointed out to psychohistory. He said something to the effect that I had focused on Amerindians. But pure whites also did similar things.

Among Scandinavians, the practices of throwing living offerings in holy waters began in the Stone Age and continued during the Bronze and Iron ages. There was never a Golden Age, as shown in the remains of sacrificed children even in the days of our pre-human ancestors.

By the 3rd century BCE whites were already offering human lives in Scandinavia: hundreds of men, women and children have been found in lakes that were sacred. In 1839, a Danish newspaper published an article about the exhumation of a body from a peat bog in Jutland, and to date several hundred mummified bodies of Scandinavians who had been dumped in the bogs, slaughtered 2,400 years ago, have been exhumed.

The 1974 book The Northmen by Thomas Froncek and the team of Time-Life shows several photographs of those victims, including the mummified body of a girl who, preserved by the peat bog, shows that she was a beautiful young blonde woman, who was attached to a large stone to drown her. Her entire body was found in 1952 at the bottom of a Schleswig-Holstein bog.

Why did even the beautiful Nordics do these things with their crown of the evolution they had created through sexual selection (the Aryan woman)? Recently a commenter sent me a very good edition of James George Frazer’s The Golden Bough. But Frazer lacked the tool of psychohistory because it did not exist when he lived (1854-1941). In his truly encyclopaedic work Frazer was unable to explain why on earth can people sacrifice their own children or their women, a practice that sometimes included torture.

As psychohistory explains, everything has to do with the traumas caused by ‘the long childhood’ in our species: traumas that demand not only repetition, but also sublimation of the parents onto figures of demanding gods (or a demanding monotheistic god).

Lloyd deMause, who died this year, figured out much of the why such horrible rituals cropped up in all human races since prehistory. But who among the commenters is interested in my work? DeMause was such a deranged liberal that I had to take over his psychohistory, turn it, and use it as a tool for the priest of the 4 and 14 words.

9 Comments

  1. Having transferred the abusive parental image to deities also explains why, suffering a sort of Stockholm syndrome with our parents (as we couldn’t become independent during our childhood), we worship horrible gods—like the Christian god of eternal torture!

    I consider children those adults who haven’t noticed this dynamic that makes us slaves of parental introjects, as I tried to illustrate in my two previous entries with a chapter of my biography.

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  3. “Human sacrifice” in the Ancient Germanic world is just a spooky way of describing tribal eugenics and capital punishment in a pre-civilization context. Many of those “sacrificed” were criminals, possessed deformities, etc.

    • That’s untrue according to the above-mentioned The Northmen by Thomas Froncek. You also seem to have missed Day of Wrath (e.g., this chapter). It references cases when the Ancient Germanic world behaved just like non-whites as to human sacrifice.

      If that’s not enough, I recommend you obtain a copy of James George Frazer’s The Golden Bough: a superb treatise on comparative anthropology. Originally a 12-volume work, Robert Fraser published an excellent abridgment of only a single volume (the one that another commenter sent me thru mail).

      • I couldn’t find a copy of The Northmen. I’m surprised I hadn’t heard of Frazer’s tome before, I’ll definitely look into it.

      • Since The Northmen is printed by academic and also Time-Life editions, it shouldn’t be difficult to find the latter in libraries.

  4. We Homines sapientes are predatory omnivores whose prey of choice is our own kind; if no longer to eat, now finally upon which to count coup by one-upmanship.

  5. ” In his truly encyclopaedic work Frazer was unable to explain why on earth can people sacrifice their own children or their women”

    I believe you’re overstating your case here, in part because you haven’t had time to go through it carefully yet. He does discuss human sacrifice and how it relates to his fundamental theory in some depth, and IIRC at least some of the cases he mentions involve children and women (most notably the wicker man ceremony, that Susan Cooper bowdlerized in her “Dark is Rising” books).

    You might disagree with his explanation or consider it incomplete, but to say he is “unable” doesn’t fit what he wrote.

  6. Reblogged this on My Journey.


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