The lion and the rose

‘The Lion and the Rose’ is the second episode of the fourth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 32nd overall. The episode was written by George R. R. Martin, and directed by Alex Graves. It focuses on the long-awaited royal wedding between Joffrey Baratheon and Margaery Tyrell and ends with Joffrey’s death after drinking poisoned wine, abruptly killing one of the show’s villains.

Queen Selyse Baratheon, née Florent, is the wife of Stannis Baratheon, the Lord of Dragonstone and claimant to the Iron Throne. Selyse was born into House Florent of Brightwater Keep, a noble house of the Reach and bannermen of House Tyrell.

The imbecile King Stannis, who obeys everything the witch Melisandre tells him, orders several men to be burned at the stake, including Selyse’s brother, Ser Axell Florent, even though they had served him well. Their sin? They secretly had continued to worship the old gods, who had also been the gods of Stannis before the witch from abroad came with a new religion. Melisandre calls ‘pagans’ anyone who doesn’t worship the new god. Worst of all, Selyse is so fanatical of the new religion that she witnesses the burning of her own brother at the stake with great approval, and saying that at last the sins of all those killed at the stake have finally been burned away.

Incredibly, something similar happened throughout the Roman Empire since Constantine came to power, a story told in both The Fair Race’s Darkest Hour and Christianity’s Criminal History, available on this site. This is history that white nationalists who sympathise with Christianity dare not read. For example, what was published by Kevin MacDonald in both the second book of his trilogy and in his preface to Giles Corey’s apologetic book is rubbish, as can be seen in Daybreak’s final essay, also available on this site.

‘You are my sister’, Ser Axell Florent uselessly begs since Selyse is completely under the spell of the new religion. Accounts of the destruction of white culture from the 4th century agree that women were the most fanatical in empowering the Semites and outcasts of the Roman Empire, something similar to what happens today with woke women. If we fail to impregnate the white woman and literally own her at home, they go bananas and begin to transfer all their maternal instincts to the dispossessed, including the dispossessed Semites who in ancient times pushed the gospel to the Aryan world.

But Melisandre or Selyse would have no power were it not for a king, Stannis in this case. Then Melisandre enters the bedroom of Shireen, the little daughter of Stannis and Selyse, whom she had never seen. Melisandre explains to Shireen that the stories of the old gods are lies and fables. In a subsequent season Melisandre would go so far as to convince Stannis to burn Shireen alive at the stake to ask the true god for a favour. When that episode was released I wrote these words.

Published in: on March 27, 2021 at 1:17 pm  Comments Off on The lion and the rose  
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