Book of the Stranger

‘Book of the Stranger’ is the fourth episode of the sixth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 54th overall. Tyrion, Varys, and the mulatto couple outside Meereen are barely seen in this photo.

From this episode Sansa loses her femininity and begins to speak like a man. Interestingly, yesterday I saw a video from a Spaniard about ultra-Orthodox Jews in Jerusalem. I had never heard a rabbi speak in such perfect Spanish. The customs of these ultra-orthodox Jews allow them to have families of a dozen children, just what the Aryans need for the Master Plan of conquering the world.

If white nationalism were not fake, the first thing they would do would be to reclaim their women. And that can only be done through a transvaluation of current values to common patriarchal values in the West until not long ago. Such transvaluation would explode the Aryan population to world-conquering levels, the healthiest thing we could imagine. If Jews have power, it is because they respect male-female bipolarity. If the Aryans are dying out, it is because they believe that a beautiful nymph like Sansa can suddenly begin to think like a general, advising Jon Snow how to get Winterfell back from the Boltons. All messages from Hollywood, the media and the universities are toxic to whites. But if whites weren’t crazy, they would write reviews exposing every feminist message of the most famous television series.

It’s not just Jon, at the Wall, who is reluctant to wage war on the Boltons. At King’s Landing the High Sparrow allows Margaery to visit her brother Loras, both prisoners in the dungeons of the Faith Militant. And just as Sansa harangues Jon to fight, Margaery harangues Loras not to give up, as psychologically he seems a broken man. Margaery, on the other hand, is presented as the strong one who resists the pressure of religious fanatics. But Loras replies that he can’t be strong, even though Margaery wants to encourage him.

As if that wasn’t enough, after escaping from Ramsay, in the Iron Islands Theon talks to his sister Yara. Once again the male-female roles are reversed, to the point of rendering Yara as incredibly manly and Theon as another broken male. Those games in kindergartens where boys and girls exchange clothes are unnecessary in this brave new world if we see it even in hours of television entertainment, like this series that so many millions have seen. Worst of all is that Theon tells Yara that it is she, now that their father has died, who must rule the Iron Islands. (Remember that no woman has ever been the queen of that wild kingdom of fishermen that assaults their neighbours as the Vikings did.)

Then Sansa convinces Jon to declare war on Ramsay, but the role-reversal scenes don’t end there! In Vaes Dothrak, Dany provokes the gathered khals and kills them by setting fire to the Temple of the Dosh Khaleen (she is miraculously unburned). Martin seems to have been inspired by the Mongols to describe the Dothraki, who are even more primitive than the most barbarous in Westeros. To make matters more ridiculous, after cremating alive the great khals Dany is left with the armies of these ‘Mongols’ for her own SJW purposes. End of episode!

Published in: on April 18, 2021 at 12:52 pm  Comments (1)  

One Comment

  1. What are your thoughts on historical female militants such as Boudica and Joan of Arc?

    I’ve even heard that the ancient Persians had some female naval Captain’s.


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