The spoils of war

‘The Spoils of War’ is the fourth episode of the seventh season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 64th overall. The stills show the Stark siblings reunited in this episode, for the first time after they tragically parted ways in the first season. All the scenes in the series and the novels where a heart tree appears have a special charm (below, Sansa under Winterfell’s heart tree).

The first feminist scene takes place in Dragonstone Cave, where Jon shows Dany some ancient cave paintings. Given that Dany and Cersei are the queens who are fighting to see who will sit on the Iron Throne, one might think that Dany could at least tolerate a single king (Jon) in the far north. But no: she tells Jon that she will only help him defeat the Night King if he bends the knee and accepts Dany as the queen of the Seven Kingdoms. If Jon accepts Dany’s proposal, all of Westeros will be ruled by one woman when the powerful Dany defeats Cersei.

Another ultra-feminist message occurs when Brienne tells her male squire, ‘Move aside, Podrick!’, who had fallen to the ground several times training with Brienne. She says those words to him because Arya requests a training exercise from her. Now these two women are the best swordsmen in Winterfell! (It is useless to reiterate that this is an absolute reversal of sexual roles and historical reality in a medieval castle.)

In the previous post we saw that Dany’s mulatto army defeats the Aryan Lannisters in another castle, Casterly Rock. At the end of this episode Dany’s other coloured army, which as I have said Martin seems to have been inspired by the Mongols, defeated the Lannister on the Roseroad (although this time aided by Dany’s dragons).

Published in: on April 28, 2021 at 9:27 am  Comments (2)  

2 Comments

  1. Herr César, I think there are better elements of disscussion in the series called The man in the hight castle instead of the bullshit of game of thrones. There are great scenes, and being a priest of the fourteen words we see the antagonists as the real good guys. Sadly we have to be careful with the degeneracy presented and avoid it.

    • If this review of mine will appear in my next book vs. feminism (that includes Game of Thrones & The Queen’s Gambit) it’s because they were so very popular. I only debunk the big hits; I don’t usually watch TV.


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