Panentheism

In the article about Savitri Devi’s wise voice, Krist Krusher commented:

One problem that I have with pantheism is, that if the universe itself is god, then would that mean insects, faeces and non-whites are also part of god? I find such an idea preposterous: such a realization undermines the entirety of the idea of god. It reduces god to simply mean anything and everything. Such is not worth worshipping or venerating to me.

I was personally a little disillusioned when I read Who We Are and found that Pierce, using his Comostheistic logic, ‘deduced’ that even Negroes were in a way brothers to Whites! The particular paragraph:

It is important to understand this, because with understanding comes freedom from the superstition of ‘human brotherhood’. We are one with the Cosmos and are, in a sense, brothers to every living thing: to the amoeba, to the wolf, to the chimpanzee, and to the Negro. But this sense of brotherhood does not paralyze our will when we are faced with the necessity of taking certain actions—whether game control or pest control or disease control—relative to other species in order to ensure the continued progress of our own. And so it must be with the Negro.

The problem with this is that it ultimately creates another kind of Brotherhood, one which if coupled with the kind of thinking that slave morality produces, would result in something as asinine as Jainism-where all life has worth regardless if it is paramecium, slime mould or cockroach! It would be such an easy thing to bend to erroneous belief.

Some will argue that the end of the paragraph would guarantee that this would never be perverted, but I know many who would warp it to think non-whites can be ‘Aryan’ too.

Evolutionists say that all creatures are connected by a common ancestor. As repulsive as it is, even spiders and we have a common ancestor (except for the very last episode that ruined the series, this series explains it all).

Divinity is obviously noticeable in some aspects of Nature such as trees, the colour of the sky with the background of the mountains and some cute mammals (including the nymphs we see in the German section of this site). But side by side there are real monsters in Nature.

My solution at the end of From Jesus to Hitler is exterminationism. Either way, Nature is the greatest exterminationist in the universe. For hundreds of millions of years it has been exterminating ninety-nine per cent of her species. Getting rid of obsolete species is critical to Kalki, a subject in which Savitri Devi was utterly wrong in some passages of Impeachment of Man. Naively, she idealised all animal species. Instead, we want to exterminate most of them (you can picture our little utopia with the city of Lys in Arthur Clarke’s Against the Fall of Night).

If the Cro-Magnon exterminated the Neanderthal, all the more should we exterminate the primitive versions of Homo sapiens. This is not contradicted by panentheism. On the contrary: it is an essential part of the evolution or phenomenology of the spirit. William Pierce was right; for example, my exterminationist passion is not hampered one iota by my panentheism.* Both are the axes of the same double-helix, the religious DNA that moves me.

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(*) Some theologians use this term as a kind of mixture between theism and pantheism. I use it because, to my mind, there is the possibility that there could be some sort of nebulous agency before the big bang. But I hate metaphysical speculations.

10 Comments

  1. But Krist Krusher has a point. This is what I wrote last December:

    Years ago I began to translate for this site several texts by the Spaniard Manu Rodríguez, who in more recent times abandoned all racism to dedicate himself to an idea that he already harboured since 1976: the New Age philosophy that revolves around the Gaia hypothesis. I mention Rodríguez because I was shocked by his abandonment of what I had been translating from his site. But it must be recognised that it is not easy to transvalue values: the magnet that Normieland exerts on those who are stunned in the middle of the Rubicon is formidable.

    But the mention of Rodríguez is spot on. After his conversion to Gaia I wrote to him some time ago asking if he had read my exterminationist essays and he replied that it was surely a joke of mine (it is not). That was the end of our correspondence.

    Now, the fact is that Rodríguez’s Gaia philosophy, which he writes in Spanish, is the perfect antithesis of efilism (‘nor do we worship Nature’ says the efilist in the long quotation above). My philosophy of the four words represents the moderate position between the two extremes, as Rodríguez naively accepts all earthly life [Savitri Devi’s error, although like us she apparently wanted to exterminate the Neanderthals], without considering the astronomical magnitudes of suffering that many living creatures experience.

    My December 2020 article can be read: here.

  2. I too would agree to disagree with the positive truth of Savitri Devi’s assertions, all the while accepting her elevating inspiration. Archaeologists have excavated no Golden Age but munched bones. A cosmic god who breeds niggers and spiders for us to exterminate seems hysterical.

    A lesson to me is to venerate beauty and the most high despite all the ugly and the low. However sorrowful the world is, a Christian must I not become.

    • > ‘ A cosmic god who breeds niggers and spiders for us to exterminate seems hysterical’.

      This is why (unlike most white nationalists who subscribe an abrahamic religion) we reject theism.

  3. I didn’t read your essay “From Jesus to Hitler”, but getting rid of obsolete species (exterminationism as you call it) and creation of ideally closed ecosystems in the cognizable Universe must be a heuristic Task for the Kalkian civilization to come.

    Only the supreme species and supreme consciousnesses hierarchically-organized could “inherit the earth” of the Golden Age.

    However, it is incomprehensible what does conscious efforts one need to make for this idea to become viable – as on social scale of the current civilization (an abolition of it), as during a single and transient human life.

    Just awaiting deus ex machina (Kalki the Avenger and the Transfigurator) is a despicable lot. Who will be glorious forerunners of Him?

    • Perhaps those who have suffered the world’s horrors to the fullest are the forerunners, as I try to explain in my 644,000-word De Jesús a Hitler, divided into eleven books for easy reading.

  4. After seeing the word Panentheism mentioned, I have to admit it makes infinitely more sense that god[s] exists/exist independently of the universe outside them and vice-versa. Panentheism is perhaps the most logical religion that could ever be.
    In addition, it challenges the materialist and theistic views well enough to overthrow both. Like Fascism, that was successfully able to combat both Marxism and Supercapitalism, it sheds light to reveal a false dichotomy.

    • You should read Collin Cleary’s book “Summoning the Gods”. You will probably reject it because of what he says about the will, but that’s your loss.

      Summoning the Gods

      • The final chapter is about an extremely degenerate Jew whose movies, filmed in Mexico, I knew decades ago.

  5. I thought about it more and noticed a significant divide between you and SD. Savitri laments the extinction of tigers because they seem noble and perfect creatures to her. Whereas you cheer on because they are cruel carnivores. In this way, SD stands closer to Nietzsche with his yea to life and amor fati which you explicitly oppose.

    Man doesn’t seem to care either way. Look at horses – all in bondage, the wild ones exterminated, and when redundant, the tamed ones culled likewise. Now that is a heartless and ideology-free, machine-like, efficient practice. Unfortunately, the Christians haven’t applied it to niggers/Chinese, the rest is history.

    • Savitri lived in times when there were no television channels capturing all the cruelties within the animal kingdom, like what we can see today.

      And we must not believe that Nietzsche was consistent in his philosophy: his thought was full of contradictions. It was precisely the day when, in an Italian town, he saw a horse being badly mistreated that he suffered the psychotic breakdown from which he never recovered.


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