The Bells

‘The Bells’ is the fifth and penultimate episode of the eighth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 72nd overall. It was written by D&D and aired on May 12, 2019. ‘The Bells’ features the final battle for control of the Iron Throne, with Dany’s forces commencing their assault on Cersei’s forces at King’s Landing.

Quite apart from D&D’s big mistake of compacting the plots that were left unfinished in a couple of episodes, fans also erred big by misjudging the last two episodes of the show. Although it would’ve required more seasons for proper execution, it makes sense for Dany to burn King’s Landing in this penultimate episode. See Yezenirl’s video ‘Foreshadowing is not Character Development: The Rationalization of Tyranny’.

Instead of commenting on the bad messages from ‘The Bells’, I prefer to talk about one of the bad messages from the next episode, the finale.

Even at the show’s most interesting moment, Tyrion’s speech, the writers managed to insert a feminist message: Sansa’s little sermon that left her as Queen of the North! As Yezenirl observed in an interview, that is cheating on the profound message of that moment.

Incidentally, on the 19th of this month I’ll post a transcript of Yezenirl’s video on why Bran’s coronation was precisely where Martin’s story was headed.

Published in: on May 6, 2021 at 1:01 am  Comments (1)  

The long night

‘The Long Night’ is the third episode of the eighth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 70th overall. Below, the most beautiful moment of the episode according to Yezen (including the music I’d add) in his video ‘Why Theon should have killed the Night King’.

I have said that Martin didn’t finish the last two novels of his epic when D&D were filming the series. If I had been the director, instead of what the D&D Jews did—trying to compact what Martin had confessed to them in a few episodes—I would have devised the script differently so as not to spoil the plot, as D&D spoiled it. I simply would have forgotten about the game of thrones, or the war between the two bitches, and focused solely on the threat that the army of the dead posed to Westeros once the Night King’s dragon brought down the Wall.

From that angle, the long night in the sense of the long battle that was fought at Winterfell would have appeared at the end of the last season. And instead of the ultra-feminist scene that D&D came up with—the girl Arya kills the Night King in this episode—I would have chosen Theon to be ‘The Hero of Winterfell’. That way we wouldn’t have seen packed together, in just six episodes, a complex plot—or rather plots—that should have been filmed over several seasons.

It’s no excuse that the directors have run out of Martin’s latest novels. If they had been good artists they would have simplified the plot, guillotining any war between Dany and Cersei from the script—that is, the ‘game of thrones’—so that the show would look more like ‘a song of ice and fire’. The Night King, the white walkers and the army of the dead live on ice on the north side of the Wall; and fire is represented by the character most loved by fans, Jon, who lives on the south side of the Wall. As we saw, in previous episodes it’s revealed that Jon is Aegon Targaryen, and in Martin’s universe the Targaryens represent fire.

Without Martin’s latest novels, that would have been the compromise a good screenwriter would have made.

In many respects, ‘The Long Night’ is the culmination of the entire series. The following episodes, # 71, # 72 and # 73 represent a huge anticlimax that disappointed the fandom. And while the battle against the army of the dead in this episode is the most exciting of all seasons, I suspect that the feminist agenda finally stretched the show’s credibility to breaking point (as we said above Theon, not a girl, should have killed the Night King).

Published in: on May 4, 2021 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  

A knight of the seven kingdoms

‘A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms’ is the second episode of the eighth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 69th overall. The first feminist message of the episode is seen in the Winterfell smithy, during the dialogue between Gendry and Arya. I don’t even want to detail it because, later, what happens between them is worse. As always, the woman is on top of the man in the sexual act, and in this case Arya was losing her virginity! By getting on top of him, she plays the role of the macho.

Later, speaking alone with Sansa, Dany tells her: ‘We have other things in common. We’ve both known what it means to lead people who aren’t inclined to accept a woman’s rule. And we’ve both done a damn good job of it, from what I can tell’.

But that’s nothing. The most offensive scene of the episode comes later, when Davos gives hot food to every commoner in Winterfell, outside the castle walls, in the winter. An adult male gets the soup with these words: ‘My lord, we’re no soldiers’. The men from the north are preparing to fight the Night King’s army, which has already crossed the Wall and is heading to Winterfell. Davos replies: ‘You are now’ and the man is stunned. Davos has to reassure him with personal anecdotes, as Davos isn’t a warrior either (although he has participated in important battles).

The next person who reaches out to Davos with an empty plate to receive the soup is a little girl, about ten years old, and she says to Davos with the accent of a little English girl: ‘All the children will be going below [of the castle] when the time comes. But… I want to fight’. There can be no clearer message.

Above, Podrick, Brienne’s squire, right before Jaime knighted Brienne, a woman, for the first time in Westeros history. That naming gave the episode its title, ‘A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms’.

In the next scene, Jorah Mormont asks his cousin Lyanna Mormont—the girl who, as we have seen, has admonished Jon several times in front of the lords—to stay in the crypt under the castle during the battle, along with the women and children. Lady Mormont replies that she will fight alongside her soldiers (in the next episode we will see that she dies heroically when the Night King’s army of the dead infiltrates the castle).

Perhaps what was most worth hearing from the episode was the song Podrick sings on the eve of the enemy army arriving at Winterfell, which can be heard: here. Many of those in the castle will die in a few hours. The song conveys a state of unusual relaxation before facing destiny.

Published in: on May 3, 2021 at 11:38 am  Leave a Comment  

Winterfell

‘Winterfell’ is the eighth season premiere episode of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 68th overall. It aired in 2019 and the previous season in 2017. What happened in 2018?

I have said several times that the slogan of contemporary cinema seems to be ‘everything for the eye, nothing for the mind’. Well, the show’s technicians spent all of 2018 doing the complicated CGI effects on the dragons for the final season. It was such a laborious task that they skipped an entire year leaving the eager audience in a long two-year wait!

Unsurprisingly, this ‘all for the eye, nothing for the mind’ practice, and in just six episodes for what should have been six more seasons, ruined the series from the point of view of a plausible narrative. However, from our point of view the series was already ruined from the first episode of the first season due to its bad messages.

If there is something ‘for the mind’ that the show left us, it is its feminist trickery. True, from a cinematic point of view, the opening scene of the eighth season is superb: from when we see a boy running in the first seconds until Jon kisses Bran on the forehead (Jon had not seen Bran since he left him comatose and his life hanging by a thread in the first season). George Lucas visited the set where the opening scene was filmed, in which Dany and Jon arrive at Winterfell with an impressive army.

But already in the great hall of Winterfell with the gathered lords we see the first ultra-feminist scene when the Mormont girl, who still doesn’t menstruate because of how young she is, reprimands Jon in front of everyone. At the time of the reprimand Jon is sitting in the hall flanked by two other women: Sansa and Dany. With these TV messages, should we be surprised that adolescent girls have become so insolent?

As is typical of the show, we then see Bronn sexually ridden by a woman (a prostitute), flanked by two other naked women. Politically correct directors seem to be reluctant to film a man riding a woman: their mission is to reverse reality even in bed.

Then we see a third feminist scene when Theon rescues Yara from Euron’s ship and, instead of thanking him Yara headbutts her brother (was it because he didn’t help her at the exact moment when Euron kidnapped her)? Already setting sail, Theon tells Yara that she is his queen, and that he will do what she orders, before a goodbye hug.

This is what fans waited patiently, for two years, to finally see…

Published in: on May 2, 2021 at 11:43 am  Leave a Comment  

Beyond the Wall

‘Beyond the Wall’ is the sixth and penultimate episode of the seventh season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 66th overall. Here we see Beric talking to Jon on the other side of the Wall.

From this episode until the grand finale we began to see problems of another kind. Since George R.R. Martin didn’t finish the last two novels of his epic when they were filming the last two seasons, the producers rushed the story to levels that spoiled the rhythm of the series.

Many fans of the novels are furious with Martin because even today he has not finished the last two novels of A Song of Ice and Fire. I feel a little more empathy for the writer. Writing is a thankless task that is done in solitude, in the writer’s home. Most writers can’t even make a living from their craft. When the miracle happens, as it happened to Martin when HBO decided to bring his most ambitious work to the small screen, it is natural that with the river of money flowing towards the writer he changes his lifestyle, doing the writing in the bedroom more difficult, especially due to Martin’s advanced age.

But the mistake of this episode and others of the following season is that Martin was right in asking the creators of the HBO series David Benioff and D. B. Weiss that the series should run for about fourteen seasons. That would mean that filming would be roughly halfway through by now. If we assume one season per year, the eighth season should have been released in 2018; the ninth in 2019, the tenth in 2020 and this month that I write the fans would be watching the eleventh.

Benioff and Weiss went their own way by taking a shortcut, narrowing down the remaining seven seasons in episodes 66 to 73. And unlike previous seasons that had ten episodes each, the seventh season only has seven. The following season, the eighth and last, only six episodes. That’s far from the adequate pace, although it was only until the middle of the eighth season that fans were very disappointed by this rush.

But still, in this rushed episode 66, we see two conversations between the Stark sisters in which Arya tells Sansa that since she was a child she wanted to become a knight, though there are still no female knights in Westeros; and that she wanted to break the rules. (Worse still, the writers recast this Arya girl with psychopathic traits as we see when she talks to Sansa.) But feminism doesn’t end there. Near the end of the episode the king of the north, Jon, promises Dany that he will bend the knee before her.

The spoils of war

‘The Spoils of War’ is the fourth episode of the seventh season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 64th overall. The stills show the Stark siblings reunited in this episode, for the first time after they tragically parted ways in the first season. All the scenes in the series and the novels where a heart tree appears have a special charm (below, Sansa under Winterfell’s heart tree).

The first feminist scene takes place in Dragonstone Cave, where Jon shows Dany some ancient cave paintings. Given that Dany and Cersei are the queens who are fighting to see who will sit on the Iron Throne, one might think that Dany could at least tolerate a single king (Jon) in the far north. But no: she tells Jon that she will only help him defeat the Night King if he bends the knee and accepts Dany as the queen of the Seven Kingdoms. If Jon accepts Dany’s proposal, all of Westeros will be ruled by one woman when the powerful Dany defeats Cersei.

Another ultra-feminist message occurs when Brienne tells her male squire, ‘Move aside, Podrick!’, who had fallen to the ground several times training with Brienne. She says those words to him because Arya requests a training exercise from her. Now these two women are the best swordsmen in Winterfell! (It is useless to reiterate that this is an absolute reversal of sexual roles and historical reality in a medieval castle.)

In the previous post we saw that Dany’s mulatto army defeats the Aryan Lannisters in another castle, Casterly Rock. At the end of this episode Dany’s other coloured army, which as I have said Martin seems to have been inspired by the Mongols, defeated the Lannister on the Roseroad (although this time aided by Dany’s dragons).

Published in: on April 28, 2021 at 9:27 am  Comments (2)  

The queen’s justice

‘The Queen’s Justice’ is the third episode of the seventh season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 63rd overall.

The first feminist message of the episode is the meeting between Dany and Jon at Dragonstone. I’ve been mentioning the nickname ‘Dany’ that Jon would give the queen when, in later episodes, they became lovers. But the official title of this feminist icon is just the way Missandei introduced her queen to Jon: ‘You stand in the presence of Daenerys Stormborn, of the House Targaryen: Rightful Queen of the Andals and the First Men, protector of the Seven Kingdoms, the Mother of Dragons, the Khalessi of the Great Grass Sea, the Unburnt [fire doesn’t burn her] and the Breaker of Chains [i.e., a SJW queen]’.

Regarding the other queen who also claims to be the protector of the Seven Kingdoms, Tycho Nestoris of the Iron Bank tells Cersei that she is the first queen in the history of Westeros. In other words, there had been no women in power prior to the show’s internal timeline.

It’s becoming increasingly clear that the show is, as we have been saying, a projection of the current lifestyles of a dying race to a medieval world that never existed. Later the episode shows us another kind of bad message: Grey Worm’s mulatto army infiltrates Casterly Rock and captures the castle of the Aryan Lannisters.

Then we see how, after Jaime, Randyll and their armies take Highgarden, Jaime Lannister (pic above) speaks one last time with Olenna before she drinks a poisoned cup.

YouTube fans are already starting to talk about the new series that HBO wants to premiere next year: a prequel to Game of Thrones based on Martin’s fiction (something akin to what Peter Jackson did after his LOTR trilogy). From the casting we can guess that feminism will apparently continue, and perhaps this time one of the main characters is a black man. Hopefully the US dollar will collapse before its release so that the circus will stop looking funny to these degenerate whites…

Published in: on April 27, 2021 at 4:40 pm  Leave a Comment  

Stormborn

‘Stormborn’ is the second episode of the seventh season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 62nd overall. We see the first feminist message in Dany’s war council that used to be Stannis’ headquarters. Dany invited three powerful women, Olenna Tyrell, Yara Greyjoy, and Ellaria Sand as allies to overthrow another woman, Queen Cersei. Olenna, Yara, and Ellaria are hawks while Tyrion recommends restraint to avoid unnecessary genocide.

The warriors with balls are women, and those who care for civilians are men (Varys is also in the Dragonstone war council as Dany’s counsel). That eagerness to behave like a hawk is even more noticeable when Olenna is left alone talking to Dany, haranguing her to honour her Targaryen surname, that she becomes a true dragon.

We see the second feminist message of the episode when Sansa, once again in the war council of Winterfell with the lords of the north, again contradicts, and resoundingly, the decisions of the king of the north, Jon. In the real world, an insolent woman who had done a scene like the one Sansa had done in the previous episode would not have entered the war council room again. But here, obviously, the male kings tolerate these mouthy little women, even the Mormont girl who opens her little mouth again at Jon’s war council to show her disagreements.

The worst thing is that, when Jon Snow accepts the invitation to visit Dany in Dragonstone, he leaves Sansa as Guardian of the North in Winterfell. So now three women rule Westeros: Cersei in King’s Landing, Dany the invader (who has allied with Olenna, Yara and Ellaria), and Sansa as guardian of the north while Jon Snow returns from his dangerous diplomatic mission.

Published in: on April 26, 2021 at 12:34 pm  Comments (1)  

Dragonstone

‘Dragonstone’ is the seventh season premiere episode of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 61st overall. Almost all episodes begin with a minute and a half opening credits in which we listen to the musical theme of the series that became so popular. Here, instead, David Benioff and D. B. Weiss kicked off the season with an ultra-feminist scene. In my previous post I said that the girl Arya had killed the principals of House Frey. But this girl is so powerful, and let’s remember that we are in the scene before the opening credits, that she manages to kill the rest of House Frey—dozens of them, all males, and in the end she walks over the corpses.

The imbecile fans loved the scene. For me, the fact that millions of fans didn’t mind that a single girl was capable of killing all the males in their own feudal castle, shows that the Aryan problem encompasses the Jewish problem. Not wanting to see that the masses are surreally brutalised is part of the blindness of white nationalists, who don’t quite understand what’s happening.

But the opening scene is only the overture of what comes next. In Winterfell, the Mormont girl returns with her practice of lecturing a feudal lord and Jon Snow allows Sansa to confront him before the lords and ladies of the north. Sansa is not the wife of Jon, the king of the north. In the real feudal world she had to be completely subordinate to the will of her stepbrother. She shouldn’t even have a voice on the war council. But we are in a series in which the same actor who played Jon said in an interview that Game of Thrones was a feminist show.

It is true what I said in my previous post: the great hits of white culture should be studied more than the subversion of the Frankfurt School. But reviewing these episodes represents a great test of patience for me. However, since there is no blogger among racialists who dedicates himself to exposing every bad message on television series, I feel compelled to do so at least with the most popular series of all, no matter what bile my body secretes by imposing this homework on me.

Returning to the initial episode of the season, it ends when Dany arrives with her armada at Dragonstone, from where she plans how to defeat the other queen, Cersei.

Published in: on April 25, 2021 at 11:41 am  Leave a Comment  

The winds of winter

‘The Winds of Winter’ is the tenth and final episode of the sixth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the sixtieth overall.

It opens with artistic scenes in the Great Sept that are worth watching even if you don’t see the rest of the episode. Martin was obviously inspired by the medieval church.

High Sparrow: ‘Will you fight to defend your faith against heretics and apostates?’

Brother Loras: ‘I will’.

But even in the Big Sept the writers put up a damn feminist scene. Addressing the High Sparrow, Margaery blasphemes (‘Forget about the Bloody Gods and listen to what I’m telling you!’) in front of the Faith Militant, a sort of inquisitors, and all the nobles gathered at the trial of Loras and Cersei.

This is something as inconceivable as a woman shouting something similar to the pope of other times in St. Peter’s Basilica with the Holy Inquisition present.

The scene is ultra-feminist because Margaery not only curses in a holy place. She’s so clever that she senses that somehow the Great Sept is going to be attacked—something unbelievable within the plot itself. After the Night King killed the old man tangled in the tree only his disciple, the new three-eyed raven, has the power to know these things clairvoyantly (wildfire cache about to explode under the Great Sept).

Even worse, much worse, is what happens after the Great Sept explodes killing everyone, religious and nobles included. This level of feminism is so repulsive that I will tell it very briefly. The girl Arya, who should be dead from the stab wounds she received in a previous episode, single-handedly murders the feudal lord of House Frey and his sons. (Before that scene, Tyrion, supposedly the most intelligent man in Westeros, tells Dany ‘I believe in you’ and Dany turns him into Hand of the Queen with all the ritual of kneeling before the queen, etc.)

But the ridiculous feminist messages don’t end there. In Winterfell, after a few words from Jon Snow now that the Boltons were defeated for good, the prepubescent Mormont girl lectures three mature feudal lords! And it is this girl who, speaking to all the assembled lords of the north, proposes, now that there is no longer a guardian of the north, Jon Snow as the king and all acclaim him.

I have said it elsewhere and it bears repeating. To understand the darkest hour of the West what is needed is to understand the greatest hits of mass culture, as it was in the 19th century Uncle Tom’s Cabin (remember that Lincoln told its author: ‘So you’re the little woman who wrote the book that made this great war!’) and Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ, which also became a tremendous bestseller in the United States. In the 20th century, the film based on it would win eleven Academy Awards, and in the 21st century BLM would inherit the message from the little woman Lincoln spoke to.

It is there, the hits, where we can calibrate the pulse of the white man’s collective unconscious. In other words, to understand the dark hour it’s better to understand Game of Thrones than the boring texts of the Frankfurt School. It’s pop culture that drives the stupid masses, not so much what Kevin MacDonald discusses in The Culture of Critique.

To culminate the end of the sixth season, after the suicide of King Tommen there are no longer any men sitting on the Iron Throne. Now it’s a woman’s turn:

Qyburn: ‘I now proclaim Cersei of the House Lannister, First of Her Name, Queen of the Andals and the First Men, Protector of the Seven Kingdoms. Long may she reign!’

But Cersei is not the only queen. In the final scene of the season we see Dany with a massive armada, with her dragons flying above, crossing the sea to conquer Westeros.

The Battle of the Bitches is what lies ahead…