The last of the Starks

‘The Last of the Starks’ is the fourth episode of the eighth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 71st overall.

As I said in the previous instalment of this series, ‘The Long Night’ is so exciting that the anticlimax is unwatchable. If I had directed the show, in addition to removing feminism from it; the soft-porn scenes, Arya’s psycho traits, and putting Theon as the late hero instead of an heroine, I would’ve ended the series by filming, in this episode, Bran’s coronation after Jon led a mass cremation funeral for the dead (the latter we do see in the HBO series).

In that way the series wouldn’t have ended in the eighth season but in the seventh, in 2017: this eleventh episode being the anticlimax (something common in masterpieces of literature).

If you look at the popularity statistics for Game of Thrones, after Arya killed the monarch of the white walkers and the wights, the Night King, the fan acceptance plummeted. On the one hand I am pleased, although anti-feminism wasn’t the cause of the repudiation of this season but the blunder of squeezing all the complex plots pending in a couple of episodes.

The feminist messages that continue in this episode are not worth describing further, except that while watching ‘The Last of the Starks’ tonight I counted two of them.

Published in: on May 5, 2021 at 1:22 am  Leave a Comment  

The long night

‘The Long Night’ is the third episode of the eighth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 70th overall. Below, the most beautiful moment of the episode according to Yezen (including the music I’d add) in his video ‘Why Theon should have killed the Night King’.

I have said that Martin didn’t finish the last two novels of his epic when D&D were filming the series. If I had been the director, instead of what the D&D Jews did—trying to compact what Martin had confessed to them in a few episodes—I would have devised the script differently so as not to spoil the plot, as D&D spoiled it. I simply would have forgotten about the game of thrones, or the war between the two bitches, and focused solely on the threat that the army of the dead posed to Westeros once the Night King’s dragon brought down the Wall.

From that angle, the long night in the sense of the long battle that was fought at Winterfell would have appeared at the end of the last season. And instead of the ultra-feminist scene that D&D came up with—the girl Arya kills the Night King in this episode—I would have chosen Theon to be ‘The Hero of Winterfell’. That way we wouldn’t have seen packed together, in just six episodes, a complex plot—or rather plots—that should have been filmed over several seasons.

It’s no excuse that the directors have run out of Martin’s latest novels. If they had been good artists they would have simplified the plot, guillotining any war between Dany and Cersei from the script—that is, the ‘game of thrones’—so that the show would look more like ‘a song of ice and fire’. The Night King, the white walkers and the army of the dead live on ice on the north side of the Wall; and fire is represented by the character most loved by fans, Jon, who lives on the south side of the Wall. As we saw, in previous episodes it’s revealed that Jon is Aegon Targaryen, and in Martin’s universe the Targaryens represent fire.

Without Martin’s latest novels, that would have been the compromise a good screenwriter would have made.

In many respects, ‘The Long Night’ is the culmination of the entire series. The following episodes, # 71, # 72 and # 73 represent a huge anticlimax that disappointed the fandom. And while the battle against the army of the dead in this episode is the most exciting of all seasons, I suspect that the feminist agenda finally stretched the show’s credibility to breaking point (as we said above Theon, not a girl, should have killed the Night King).

Published in: on May 4, 2021 at 12:01 am  Comments (4)  

Winterfell

‘Winterfell’ is the eighth season premiere episode of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 68th overall. It aired in 2019 and the previous season in 2017. What happened in 2018?

I have said several times that the slogan of contemporary cinema seems to be ‘everything for the eye, nothing for the mind’. Well, the show’s technicians spent all of 2018 doing the complicated CGI effects on the dragons for the final season. It was such a laborious task that they skipped an entire year leaving the eager audience in a long two-year wait!

Unsurprisingly, this ‘all for the eye, nothing for the mind’ practice, and in just six episodes for what should have been six more seasons, ruined the series from the point of view of a plausible narrative. However, from our point of view the series was already ruined from the first episode of the first season due to its bad messages.

If there is something ‘for the mind’ that the show left us, it is its feminist trickery. True, from a cinematic point of view, the opening scene of the eighth season is superb: from when we see a boy running in the first seconds until Jon kisses Bran on the forehead (Jon had not seen Bran since he left him comatose and his life hanging by a thread in the first season). George Lucas visited the set where the opening scene was filmed, in which Dany and Jon arrive at Winterfell with an impressive army.

But already in the great hall of Winterfell with the gathered lords we see the first ultra-feminist scene when the Mormont girl, who still doesn’t menstruate because of how young she is, reprimands Jon in front of everyone. At the time of the reprimand Jon is sitting in the hall flanked by two other women: Sansa and Dany. With these TV messages, should we be surprised that adolescent girls have become so insolent?

As is typical of the show, we then see Bronn sexually ridden by a woman (a prostitute), flanked by two other naked women. Politically correct directors seem to be reluctant to film a man riding a woman: their mission is to reverse reality even in bed.

Then we see a third feminist scene when Theon rescues Yara from Euron’s ship and, instead of thanking him Yara headbutts her brother (was it because he didn’t help her at the exact moment when Euron kidnapped her)? Already setting sail, Theon tells Yara that she is his queen, and that he will do what she orders, before a goodbye hug.

This is what fans waited patiently, for two years, to finally see…

Published in: on May 2, 2021 at 11:43 am  Comments Off on Winterfell  

Beyond the Wall

‘Beyond the Wall’ is the sixth and penultimate episode of the seventh season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 66th overall. Here we see Beric talking to Jon on the other side of the Wall.

From this episode until the grand finale we began to see problems of another kind. Since George R.R. Martin didn’t finish the last two novels of his epic when they were filming the last two seasons, the producers rushed the story to levels that spoiled the rhythm of the series.

Many fans of the novels are furious with Martin because even today he has not finished the last two novels of A Song of Ice and Fire. I feel a little more empathy for the writer. Writing is a thankless task that is done in solitude, in the writer’s home. Most writers can’t even make a living from their craft. When the miracle happens, as it happened to Martin when HBO decided to bring his most ambitious work to the small screen, it is natural that with the river of money flowing towards the writer he changes his lifestyle, doing the writing in the bedroom more difficult, especially due to Martin’s advanced age.

But the mistake of this episode and others of the following season is that Martin was right in asking the creators of the HBO series David Benioff and D. B. Weiss that the series should run for about fourteen seasons. That would mean that filming would be roughly halfway through by now. If we assume one season per year, the eighth season should have been released in 2018; the ninth in 2019, the tenth in 2020 and this month that I write the fans would be watching the eleventh.

Benioff and Weiss went their own way by taking a shortcut, narrowing down the remaining seven seasons in episodes 66 to 73. And unlike previous seasons that had ten episodes each, the seventh season only has seven. The following season, the eighth and last, only six episodes. That’s far from the adequate pace, although it was only until the middle of the eighth season that fans were very disappointed by this rush.

But still, in this rushed episode 66, we see two conversations between the Stark sisters in which Arya tells Sansa that since she was a child she wanted to become a knight, though there are still no female knights in Westeros; and that she wanted to break the rules. (Worse still, the writers recast this Arya girl with psychopathic traits as we see when she talks to Sansa.) But feminism doesn’t end there. Near the end of the episode the king of the north, Jon, promises Dany that he will bend the knee before her.

Published in: on April 30, 2021 at 12:21 pm  Comments Off on Beyond the Wall  

Battle of the bastards

‘Battle of the Bastards’ is the ninth and penultimate episode of the sixth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones and its 59th episode overall. This episode is emblematic of the series. It starts with a very easy victory for Dany, much easier than Caesar’s Veni, Vidi, Vici after the Masters invade Meereen with their fleet.

Later we see the Battle of the North—the best melee battle I’ve ever seen from a cinematic point of view. Unlike Dany and the fire of her dragons that burn the invading fleet, in the Battle of the Bastards you can see the ruthless rawness of what war really is, which is reflected in this image of the poor men under the command of the bastard Jon that are about to fight in numerical disadvantage against the army of the bastard Ramsay.

Dany, on the other side of the world in Martin’s fiction, is so powerful that she’s even capable of thinking in exterminationist terms. At the pyramid, which is being bombarded from the ships in the bay, she says to Tyrion: ‘I will crucify the Masters. I will get their fleets afire, kill every last one of their soldiers and return their cities to the dirt. That is my plan’.

The contrast between the Battle of Meereen Bay and the Battle of the Bastards couldn’t be greater. While the men on Jon’s side struggle to remain alive in a battle very realistic thanks to special effects (it is difficult to film a great carnage of horses during direct combat), the SJW Dany is granted everything thanks to the fire of her dragons. It was a great blunder to put both battles in the same episode because it shows how grotesque all this feminism is where the conquering woman appears as ultra-privileged in her warrior powers while the men have to fight every inch of the ground with blood and iron, as two armies fought in the open fields of yesteryear.

In the discussion with Tyrone, her advisor, Dany, before riding her dragon, tells him that she’s completely different from her father, who wanted to burn King’s Landing including men, women and children, even those loyal to the mad king. Tyrion replies: ‘You’re talking about destroying entire cities. It’s not entirely different’.

Another infuriating thing about many episodes, including this one, is the stupid little music they play when Dany rides her dragon and everything comes out smooth and easy—really irritating, especially compared to the eerie music they play right before the Battle of the Bastards is fought. In addition, we must take into account that all this war of Dany against the Masters is due to the latter refusing to abandon the slave system. We can already imagine what fantastic cinema would be like today if the Confederates had won the American Civil War!

Just as in the pyramid of Meereen Dany wants to become genocidal and Tyrone begs her for restraint, in the gloomy north we also see a discussion after the war council in Jon’s tent: another argument between woman and man before the battle, and also with the roles reversed. Sansa says such obvious things to Jon about elemental strategy that it is sad to see the man’s naivety. Sansa also alerts Jon about the psyops Ramsay will use on the battlefield. As we’ll see later, Jon fell flat on one of those tricks, and had it not been for the unexpected intervention of the Knights of Vale at the last minute he would have lost the Battle of the Bastards.

The script is pure rubbish although the battle, as I said, is worth watching. But before it the scriptwriters inserted a scene that reminds me of what I said in ‘On Beth’s cute tits’ although now I’m not referring to breasts but the buttocks of a woman.

Theon and Yara arrive in Meereen and ally with Dany, offering their fleet in exchange for help in overthrowing Euron and acknowledging Yara’s claim on the Iron Islands. This happens after Dany won the battle in the bay thanks to her dragons. There is a memorable phrase in the dialogue of these two women. Yara said to Dany: ‘We’d like you to help us murder an uncle [Euron] or two who don’t think a woman’s fit to rule’. That happens when we look at the image below (from left to right, Tyrion, Dany, Yara, and Theon).

Sometimes it is necessary to introduce our most intimate insights to make a point. When the episode aired on June 19, 2016, I thought how incongruous it was. In this image those who have power are women: Tyrion, the queen’s adviser, is a dwarf and Theon was literally castrated by Ramsay. When I saw the scene in 2016, I thought that we were getting the spectacle of the buttocks of the hyper-masculinised Yara, who negotiates with Dany, but they show us her buttocks in a phallic way.

A few years ago I visited the Tower of London and saw Henry VIII’s armour. I was surprised by the large metallic bulge in the genital area of the armour. Whoever was directing the tour spoke of it as a psychological weapon or psyop. But here, and I’m following my soliloquy from years ago when the episode premiered, it is Yara’s buttocks that we see, who is not only a dyke but wants to be the first queen of the Iron Islands after killing Euron. The emasculated Theon who really has the right to rule the islands once again supports, now in front of Dany, Yara’s claim and in the end these two women reach an agreement right there, in the enclosure of the pyramid that we see above.

Anyone who remembers what I said in my article about Beth’s tits will see that a creature whose buttocks seduce us cannot be a great warrior that beats us too (or a world chess champion, in Beth’s case). This topic is so important that that essay of last November will give the title to the book of my next collection of articles, although this time the central theme will be feminism. What I noticed when I saw the episode for the first time is how the language of the images seduces us: how they put Yara in tight pants so that her buttocks are drawn next to the humble Theon, the broken man.

Women have bigger buttocks than us. Years before I had already noticed this trick and also by another pair of Jewish directors, the Wachowski brothers. I’ll never forget how in The Matrix we see very well drawn the buttocks under the pants of another woman, Trinity, when she is about to board a helicopter immediately after receiving a brief course to pilot it. In cinematic language, they used a low shot by showing us this brave female warrior from behind. But this time the psyop was not the armour protrusion for Henry VIII’s balls, but Trinity’s elegant buttocks in a nonsexual scene.

Published in: on April 23, 2021 at 1:23 pm  Comments Off on Battle of the bastards  

Kill the boy

‘Kill the Boy’ is the fifth episode of the fifth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 45th overall. A healthy world in which the good guys won the war of the previous century wouldn’t present us with a romance between two mulattoes like the one we see in this episode. Worse still, in her efforts to pacify the civil war in Meereen, the blonde Dany proposes to a high-born mulatto from that city.

Regardless of those toxic messages for the mental health of the Aryans, there are strong cinematographic flaws in the episode. Remember what I said about the silly scenes of violence when Bran and company reached their destination? Something similar happens in this episode, and precisely in another mysterious area that required calm and tranquillity, like the movies of yesteryear. I mean the scene that immediately follows when Tyrion spots Drogon in the sky, in awe. The scriptwriters spoiled the entire magical setting with an attack by some kind of lepers: a scene that completely broke the rhythm of the film, just as they broke it when Bran reached the outskirts of Bloodraven’s cave.

This is a problem with modern cinema, so ready to abuse special effects at the cost of the plot. When I was a child at least some films made us reflect, occasionally with artistic masterpieces. Nowadays, the multi-million dollar productions can be summed up in a formula: All for the eye, nothing for the mind. That is why, when Martin apparently advised something ‘for the mind’ in the grand finale the fans didn’t get it.

Two years ago I wrote on this site several posts about how it was that the idiotic fans of today’s cinema didn’t get it. But let’s go back to the present episode. In the scene that precedes the silly scene of the ‘lepers’ attackers, Tyrion deduces that Jorah is taking a shortcut through Valyria. The shots when they enter the smoky sea are well thought out and set us in a mysterious place.

Valyria, also called Old Valyria, was a city in Essos and the former capital of the Valyrian Freehold. In times of the internal chronology of Martin’s novels, what we now see on the screen is in ruins, consumed by time. It had been destroyed along with the entire empire by a cataclysm known as the Doom of Valyria, more than four centuries before.

Published in: on April 9, 2021 at 5:13 pm  Comments Off on Kill the boy  

Stanley Kubrick

In his recent review of Kubrick’s most disgusting film, under the pen name of Trevor Lynch, Greg Johnson said: ‘A Clockwork Orange is obscene in the literal sense of the word: it should not be watched’.

He is right. The film only shows that the most talented film director of his time, Stanley Kubrick, after his masterpiece 2001: A Space Odyssey made an extremely toxic film for the mental health of whites: a typical psyop of non-gentiles like him.

But the perennial problem is white people who consume these things greedily, to the point of having crap like this on their list of cult movies. Most Hollywood movies should be forbidden in the ethnostate but, alas, even some white nationalists love A Clockwork Orange, as can be seen in the comments section of Johnson’s webzine. What’s the difference between them and the degenerate fans of Game of Thrones?

Published in: on April 7, 2021 at 11:39 am  Comments (6)  

The laws of gods and men

‘The Laws of Gods and Men’ is the sixth episode of the fourth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 36th overall. In the image we see Stannis at the beginning of the episode, at the Iron Bank, asking for money for a new attempt to recover the crown. But the absolutely repulsive thing is that, after that scene, in the spas of Braavos, the director of that episode, Alik Sakharov, has filmed naked blacks, mulattos and swarthy men with very white women, also naked.

If in a previous post I said that Game of Thrones fans were the worst dung since prehistory, it’s precisely due to their lack of rebellion against scenes like this. If white males don’t rebel against the ongoing miscegenation, even what we openly see on the street (such as what I saw a few years ago in London) the race is lost. Ultra-feminist scenes follow with Yara wanting to rescue her brother. But the single scene described above is enough to make me disgusted and reluctant to comment on anything about the rest of the episode.

I don’t think I should have spent my money buying the entire seasons of this series on Blu-ray. But maybe it’s time to say something important.

If there is something that irritates me greatly when watching the videos of the fans on YouTube, it is that some among them seem to know by heart each page that Martin has written with all the subplots, stories that precedes what we saw in Game of Thrones (as we also see in the LOTR appendix from the pen of J.R.R. Tolkien), names, geographic locations and much more.

If the worst generation wasn’t the worst, they would instead know in detail the history of the West, and especially what really happened in World War II.

Fiction has the magic of captivating us. In contrast, the harsh and heartless facts of real life, say what can be read in The Gulag Archipelago, are so disturbing that we tend not to go beyond the first pages. That’s why in the only comment on my new sticky post I keep announcing Goodrich’s book as the first of my required readings. In the real world the bad guys win, as opposed to fiction for the masses.

Next time I’m willing to spend what I spent buying the entire series, instead of some other Jewish-produced stupidity for the worst gentile dung in history I’ll buy David Irving’s books, or Wagner’s operas videos with subtitles to English. But at least there’s something good that came out of this purchase: it forced me to criticise every episode, which I will continue to do until I get to the finale in May.

Published in: on March 31, 2021 at 2:33 pm  Comments Off on The laws of gods and men  

Second sons

‘Second Sons’ is the eighth episode of the third season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 28th episode of the series.

An obvious mistake of the series was to change some actors, although the actors who originally played a role hadn’t died. In this episode we see the actor who originally played the role of Daario Naharis. Then, in another season, they inexplicably changed him: something that confuses the viewer. And they did the same with other important actors, including the actor who interpreted Gregor Clegane, nicknamed ‘The Mountain’, and even the Three-Eyed Raven himself, originally played by British actor Struan Rodger. The confusion was great with Gregor Clegane and Daario Naharis.

In this episode the witch Melisandre prepares to sacrifice the bastard son of King Robert to ask her god for a favour. As I have written about ritual human sacrifice, it makes me nervous to see fiction where magic is presented as real and where human sacrifices aren’t done in vain. In the real world, of course, magic has no power except the power of suggestion which only affects the credulous.

The last article I published on the subject is a recent newspaper article about human sacrifices carried out in the American continent—3,600 years ago! The Indians who conquered the continent before the arrival of the white man sacrificed their own from time immemorial until the last of the Mesoamerican civilisations, the Aztec civilisation, when the Europeans arrived.

But fiction places us in a fabulous world where, unlike the real world, human sacrifice pays off. In Stannis’ dialogue with Melisandre it’s implied that this is not the first time that she has performed a sacrifice. The witch then seduces Gendry, King Robert’s bastard, who actually looks like a lamb being taken to the slaughterhouse, leading him to the bed that appears below.

As is typical in this series, the woman mounts the man in the sexual act, although what Melisandre wants is to suck a little of his blood with leeches to do witchcraft with royal blood. But there is another scene in this episode where a man literally kneels before a woman. Daario becomes Dany’s third watchdog, swearing loyalty to her. The tough assassin Daario lasts a good few seconds kneeling before the woman with the appropriate music.

Then Tyrion, the day after his wedding night with poor Sansa, continues to let himself be treated badly by Shae instead of, now that he is already married, keep her at bay.

Published in: on March 23, 2021 at 11:58 am  Comments Off on Second sons  

Walk of punishment

‘Walk of Punishment’ is the third episode of the third season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 23rd episode of the series.

‘I want you’, poor Stannis said to the witch Melisandre on the beach, almost begging her to stay with him instead of going on a boat in search of someone to sacrifice. One might think that women cast a spell on us. But as some of the MGTOW have noted, that isn’t the case. It is our desire to possess them that makes us annul ourselves at their whim when we are in heat.

Of course, this wouldn’t happen if we had patriarchy like Republican Rome, when women were treated as property. And even in a softer patriarchy, like what we read in Jane Austen’s novels, no stupid laws had been enacted regarding marital rape. We only make a fool of ourselves when we empower them and give up the power with which Nature endowed us to the degree that we allow ourselves to be handled like puppets. That wouldn’t happen if the West regained its judgment and transvalued its values if not as far as the Roman world, at least as the values in Austen’s world.

In the episode Melisandre sees with open contempt the lust of poor Stannis. Declarations of love don’t work. We give them the power to say ‘no’. A king like Stannis Baratheon who can’t control the woman who was always by his side—compare him with the way his brother Robert Baratheon treated women—is not a true king.

In Astapor, on the other side of the world, we heard a dialogue between Jorah and Dany about war. The theme of the sword always reminds me of how feminised white nationalists are:

Jorah: You know what I saw? Butchery. Babies, children, old men. More women raped than what you can count. There’s a beast in every man, and it stirs when you put a sword in his hand.

Dany then scolds his two loyal advisers, Jorah and Barristan, when they advised her not to sell one of her dragons in exchange for an army of mulattos. The scene represents a very bad message for the white viewer. And the irony is that Emilia Clarke, the actress who played the role of Dany in all seasons, has a very feminine character in real life; so much so that she had difficulties filming scenes in which she appears as a dragon-woman in full command of her leader personality. But that’s the point of Game of Thrones: to reverse male-female roles in the perennial campaign of the media, government and universities to brainwash the white man. Dany’s dialogue with the mulatto woman Missandei, the translator she just got in Astapor while trying to sell one of her dragons, epitomises the feminist message:

Dany: And what about you? You know that I’m taking you to war. You may go hungry. You may fall sick. You may be killed.

Missandei: Valar Morghulis.

Dany: Yes, all men must die. But we are not men.

Missandei smiles. But in the penultimate episode of the last season, during the war of the bitches Dany and Cersei (note that the most powerful were queens, not kings), the latter orders Missandei be beheaded in front of Dany. But back to the episode ‘Walk of Punishment’, in the scene at Littlefinger’s brothel the Jewish director manages to keep the viewer from craving any of his white whores. I can imagine if the Germans were in charge of the cinema instead of the Jews. What would whites be watching now on the small screen?

The degenerate music of the end credits is the final insult, after Locke cut off Jaime Lannister’s hand (in the novels Locke is a cruel man sworn to House Bolton, considered by Roose Bolton as his best hunter). Again, if the Germans had won the war what music would we hear in the end credits of films today?

Published in: on March 18, 2021 at 2:20 pm  Comments Off on Walk of punishment