The North remembers

‘The North Remembers’ is the second season premiere episode of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, first aired on April 1, 2012. Since I’m using the series as Rorschach images to project ideas of my own now that I see the series again, I confess that nothing new has come to mind except to reiterate what I’ve said.

(Jack Gleeson as Joffrey Baratheon.) The teenage King Joffrey begins to emerge as the villain of the first few seasons. Acting under his orders the king’s Guard, led by Commander Janos Slynt, tracks down and murders several of the late King Robert Baratheon’s bastard children, including babies under the screams of their mothers.

Still, if we assume a return to the monarchy in the 21st century, even a scoundrel like Joffrey could be infinitely better than any current democratic government. Without checks and balances but under the motto L’État c’est moi, a single king could expel the millions of non-whites from his lands. Under democracy, no current president could do something similar, even if he wanted.

Published in: on March 6, 2021 at 1:14 am  Comments Off on The North remembers  

The Kingsroad

‘The Kingsroad’ is the second episode of the first season of the HBO medieval fantasy television series Game of Thrones, first aired on April 24, 2011.

We see the first bad message of this episode when Jon Snow says goodbye and gives a real rapier to the little girl Arya, while she packs her clothes on the eve of the Starks’ fateful trip to King’s Landing. Thus the masculinisation of a little girl is promoted by one of the central characters, perhaps the most beloved, of all seasons: Jon Snow. If those who caused the darkest hour in the West, the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Soviet Union had lost the war, our world wouldn’t be turned upside down. A scene like this would never have been filmed.

Since this rapier is very light, so light that a little girl can wield it, in the real world she would never have had a chance to compete, in real combat, with the heavy swords wielded by men. Not only is Arya, as we said in ‘Winter is coming’, the most mishandled character of all Game of Thrones seasons, but the white fans who didn’t rebel against these insults to reason and good judgment are complicit in what the Jews of Hollywood, HBO or Netflix do.

Hugging Jon Snow in goodbye, and with her little legs dangling in the air due to her stature, right at this moment—hugging her half-brother—Arya names her small rapier Needle, as knights used to baptise their swords. Instead of needles for her embroidery and knitting classes the girl prefers a needle that is a weapon.

Interestingly, in this 2011 episode Jon Snow kisses Bran when the latter is in a coma. Jamie Lannister had pushed him out of the Winterfell tower when Bran caught Jaime committing incest with his sister Cercei, the queen. (Jon wouldn’t see Bran again until the last season, in 2019, and also greets him with a kiss on the forehead; although by that season Bran has undergone a psychic transformation to become the three-eyed raven.)

The farewell of Robb Stark and Jon Snow is very manly: very dry but affectionate. If the white man suffered enough during the coming convergence of catastrophes, in a century we would develop once again the gravitas of the Middle Ages.

One of my favourite scenes from the show is seen in this episode, when King Robert Baratheon and Ned Stark eat lunch on a placid afternoon during the long journey from Winterfell to King’s Landing. They both speak frankly, as real men spoke. The visuals of that scene, with a variety of fruits on an outdoor table in the beautiful countryside, are quite good. If it bothers me to see masculinised women I’m even more fed up with feminised men and can’t stand the sight of them. That’s why a contemporary series that at least sometimes shows real men set in a fantastic medieval period is worth watching.

The final scenes gave the episode the title. Away from the gaze of adults, the teenage prince Geoffrey, who will inherit the Iron Throne, grossly abuses his power over the commoners. He falsely accuses Arya and her pet, one of the young wolves of the Starks, and the son of a blacksmith. But as repulsive as the future king Geoffrey is in four seasons of this series of eight seasons, democracy is infinitely worse. As Harold Covington said when he lived, democracy is a system designed not to change.

Let’s imagine for a moment that monarchy persisted in our days. Imagine that, in the West, it occurred to one of the many kings of the western nations to reverse the migration of non-whites with the absolute powers that the monarchical system grants him. (This is the opposite of how the Deep State ruled the US during Trump’s presidency.) This hypothetical king, although as repulsive in his personal life as Geoffrey, could potentially produce a chain reaction if the will of other kings was also conquered to expel Moors and Jews à la 1492 in Spain (in the present, blacks and Asians would also be expelled).

And here we come to why I am so disgusted by white nationalism, which unlike the late Covington lacks a revolutionary ideology. None of the leading figures that I know of places democracy on the dock. Who of these Americans rejects democracy? In the last two elections many of them even voted or advised their visitors on who to vote for.

In one of his podcasts William Pierce hit the nail on the head by inquiring why Jews like democracy so much: because they can control the electorate if they control the media. But the leading figures of white nationalism have cucked about something so obvious. And worst of all is that these white nationalists, by validating democracy, indirectly validate Jewry behind the media.

I would suggest that my visitors no longer enter the sites of these pretenders, nor read their books whether published by Arktos or Counter-Currents. If I want to learn German it is to read the original texts of a political system that was even better than monarchy. The rest, including what is written in the forums of the racialised right, is like an American dog that returns to its vomit.

Published in: on February 23, 2021 at 3:23 pm  Comments (1)  

Anti-Galilean quote

The Jewish decline is always gradual, never direct and never obvious. Only those who are selected by them to spread the initial disease are directly indoctrinated and bred into the poison itself. Those were the early Christian fathers. All of them were liberal lunatics. I wrote an entire article on it. Europeans switched their European Aryan spirituality and tried to represent it through Christ. As long as there existed an authority figure besides Christ, namely the King, it worked for the Europeans. Once the King as a leader was destroyed and Democracy introduced—the European spirit…

Axe of Perun (truncated comment due to censorship)

Published in: on August 6, 2018 at 4:02 pm  Comments (1)  

Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 8

the-real-hitler
 
Saturday, 26th July 1941, night
 
Notice that when the institution of monarchy has been abolished in a country—see France and Yugoslavia today!— thenceforward the institution is given over to ridicule, and can never again assert itself.

I am tempted to believe that the same thing will happen with the Church. Both are institutions that naturally developed in the direction of ceremonial and solemnity. But all that apparatus no longer means anything when the power that lay beneath it has disappeared.

Published in: on October 18, 2015 at 9:52 am  Comments Off on Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 8  

Liberalism, 5

Era of enlightenment

The development of liberalism continued throughout the 18th century with the burgeoning Enlightenment ideals of the era. This was a period of profound intellectual vitality that questioned old traditions and influenced several European monarchies throughout the 18th century. In contrast to England, the French experience in the 18th century was characterized by the perpetuation of feudal payments and rights and absolutism. Ideas that challenged the status quo were often harshly repressed. Most of the philosophes of the French Enlightenment were progressive in the liberal sense and advocated the reform of the French system of government along more constitutional and liberal lines.

Montesquieu

Baron de Montesquieu wrote a series of highly influential works in the early 18th century, including Persian Letters (1717) and The Spirit of the Laws (1748). The latter exerted tremendous influence, both inside and outside of France.

Montesquieu pleaded in favor of a constitutional system of government, the preservation of civil liberties and the law, and the idea that political institutions ought to reflect the social and geographical aspects of each community. In particular, he argued that political liberty required the separation of the powers of government.

Building on John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government, he advocated that the executive, legislative, and judicial functions of government should be assigned to different bodies. He also emphasized the importance of a robust due process in law, including the right to a fair trial, the presumption of innocence and proportionality in the severity of punishment.

Another important figure of the French Enlightenment was Voltaire. Initially believing in the constructive role an enlightened monarch could play in improving the welfare of the people, he eventually came to a new conclusion: “It is up to us to cultivate our garden”. His most polemical and ferocious attacks on intolerance and religious persecutions began to appear a few years later. Despite much persecution, Voltaire remained a courageous polemicist who indefatigably fought for civil rights—the right to a fair trial and freedom of religion—and who denounced the hypocrisies and injustices of the Ancien Régime.

Published in: on September 3, 2015 at 2:15 pm  Comments Off on Liberalism, 5  

Liberalism, 3

History of liberalism

Beginnings

The Agreement of the People (1647) [photograph: here] was a manifesto for political change, proposed by the Levellers during the English Civil War. It called for freedom of religion, frequent convening of Parliament and equality under the law.

Isolated strands of liberal thought that had existed in Western philosophy since the Ancient Greeks began to coalesce at the time of the English Civil War. Disputes between the Parliament and King Charles I over political supremacy sparked a massive civil war in the 1640s, which culminated in Charles’ execution and the establishment of a Republic. In particular, the Levellers, a radical political movement of the period, published their manifesto Agreement of the People which advocated popular sovereignty, an extended voting suffrage, religious tolerance and equality before the law.

Many of the liberal concepts of Locke were foreshadowed in the radical ideas that were freely aired at the time. Algernon Sidney was second only to John Locke in his influence on liberal political thought in eighteenth-century Britain. He believed that absolute monarchy was a great political evil, and his major work, Discourses Concerning Government, argued that the subjects of the monarch were entitled by right to share in the government through advice and counsel.

locke

These ideas were first drawn together and systematized as a distinct ideology, by the English philosopher John Locke, generally regarded as the father of modern liberalism. Locke developed the then radical notion that government acquires consent from the governed which has to be constantly present for a government to remain legitimate. His influential Two Treatises (1690), the foundational text of liberal ideology, outlined his major ideas. His insistence that lawful government did not have a supernatural basis was a sharp break with then-dominant theories of governance. Locke also defined the concept of the separation of church and state. Based on the social contract principle, Locke argued that there was a natural right to the liberty of conscience, which he argued must therefore remain protected from any government authority. He also formulated a general defense for religious toleration in his Letters Concerning Toleration.

Locke was influenced by the liberal ideas of John Milton, who was a staunch advocate of freedom in all its forms. Milton argued for disestablishment as the only effective way of achieving broad toleration. In his Areopagitica, Milton provided one of the first arguments for the importance of freedom of speech: “the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties”.

Published in: on September 2, 2015 at 11:17 pm  Comments Off on Liberalism, 3  

Liberalism, 2

Imperium Eagle

This piece has been moved
to a single entry: here.

Sparta – XI

This specific chapter of Sparta and its Law has been moved: here.

If you want to read the book Sparta and its Law from the beginning, click: here.

Published in: on September 9, 2013 at 9:00 pm  Comments (6)