Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 103

the-real-hitler

 

27th March 1942, midday

Jewish influence on German art
—Painting in Germany.

 

It’s striking to observe that in 1910 our artistic level was still extraordinarily high. Since that time, alas! our decadence has merely become accentuated. In the field of painting, for example, it’s enough to recall the lamentable daubs that people have tried to foist, in the name of art, on the German people.

This was quite especially the case during the Weimar Republic, and that clearly demonstrated the disastrous influence of the Jews in matters of art. The cream of the jest was the incredible impudence with which the Jew set about it! With the help of phony art critics, and with one Jew bidding against another, they finally suggested to the people—which naturally believes everything that’s printed—a conception of art according to which the worst rubbish in painting became the expression of the height of artistic accomplishment. The ten thousand of the élite themselves, despite their pretensions on the intellectual level, let themselves be diddled, and swallowed all the humbug. The culminating hoax—and we now have proof of it, thanks to the seizure of Jewish property—is that, with the money they fraudulently acquired by selling trash, the Jews were able to buy, at wretched prices, the works of value they had so cleverly depreciated. Every time an inventory catches my eye of a requisition carried out on an important Jew, I see that genuine artistic treasures are listed there. It’s a blessing of Providence that National Socialism, by seizing power in 1933, was able to put an end to this imposture.

Genuine artists develop only by contact with other artists. Like the Old Masters, they began by working in a studio. Let’s remember that men like Rembrandt, Rubens and others hired assistants to help them to complete all their commissions.

Amongst these assistants, only those reached the rank of apprentice who displayed the necessary gifts as regards technique and adroitness—and of whom it could be supposed that they would in their turn be capable of producing works of value. It’s ridiculous to claim, as it’s claimed in the academies, that right from the start the artist of genius can do what he likes. Such a man must begin, like everyone else, by learning, and it’s only by working without relaxation that he succeeds in achieving what he wants. If he doesn’t know the art of mixing colours to perfection—if he cannot set a background—if anatomy still has secrets for him—it’s certain he won’t go very far! I can imagine the number of sketches it took an artist as gifted as Menzel before he set himself to paint the Flute Concert at Sans-Souci.

Adolph_von_Menzel_-_A_Flute_Concert_of_Frederick_the_Great_at_Sanssouci

It would be good if artists to-day, like those of olden days, had the training afforded by the Masters’ studios and could thus steep themselves in the great pictorial traditions. If, when we look at the pictures of Rembrandt and Rubens, for example, it is often difficult to make out what the Master has painted himself and what is his pupils’ share, that’s due to the fact that gradually the disciples themselves became masters.

What a disaster it was, the day when the State began to interfere with the training of painters! As far as Germany is concerned, I believe that two academies would suffice: in Düsseldorf and Munich. Or perhaps three in all, if we add Vienna to the list. Obviously there’s no question, for the moment, of abolishing any of our academies. But that doesn’t prevent one from regretting that the tradition of the studios has been lost.

If, after the war, I can realise my great building programme—and I intend to devote thousands of millions to it—only genuine artists will be called on to collaborate.

The death of art

The following quotes are taken from The Death of Western Art by Kenneth Lloyd Anderson, which appeared in Instauration Vol. 24, No. 6, May 1999, p. 6-8 (viewable here).


Peter_Paul_Rubens
There is definitely a parallel between accepting virtually anything as art and the interracial, international egalitarian acceptance of all races and all people. A world without borders parallels art with no restrictions and no narrative history.

Six centuries of Western art have come to an end, apparently to be followed by the end of Western man. What Arthur Danto calls the “post-historical” period will be followed by post-white man, since the narrative history of Western Art was essentially narrated and created by white men.

The affirmation of white culture in art ended with WWII. Internationalism and interracialism conquered nationalism. The concept of “no borders” was increasingly reflected in the artistic concepts of unreality and nihilism.

The history of art shows that the affirmation of the sacred—those things which each race holds of divine provenance—has been the formula behind the greatest works of art.

The exciting thing about a racial preservationist movement in art is that it can revive sacred art, which has been buried by the profane art of the modern and postmodern world.

Ellen Dissanayake’s book on the biological origin of art (Homo Aestheticus, 1995, University of Washington Press) suggests that traditional art is concerned with “making special” those things which are considered important, such as birth, puberty, marriage and death.

Modern art does not make special the traditionally important aspects of life, perhaps because survival is far easier now and one doesn’t need to bond people through art for survival’s sake. Unimportant things are “made special” by the commonness and vulgarity of Pop Art subjects.

Reviving or saving a declining or dying race and culture is an exciting cause, perfectly designed for “making special” what is traditionally important—the affirmation of the sacred in art. This has the potential for creating great art.

Published in: on July 9, 2014 at 7:15 pm  Comments (22)  
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The Honeysuckle Bower

Painting of the day:

Rubens
The Honeysuckle Bower
~ 1609
Alte Pinakothek of Munich

Published in: on July 12, 2012 at 10:33 am  Leave a Comment