Even whites are animals

This is a comment from me that, instead of putting it in response to what commenters said in a recent discussion thread, I put it as an independent entry as the topic is central to understanding us.

Apparently, these commenters suffer from human megalomania: that humans are superior to animals, or that humans have souls. I doubt that they have read with due attention the books of William Pierce, or Impeachment of Man by Savitri Devi. Already in January 2015 I had published an entry with the title of ‘Animals’, and as epigraphs I chose some words from Pierce and Hunter Wallace. The latter, as a Christian, continues to believe in the existence of the human ‘soul’. But despite this he acknowledges that whites deserve to be committed to the Fruit Cake Hospital:

By that standard most people are simply animals—thinking animals, but still animals, without the essence of humanity.

William Pierce

For those who don’t believe Whites are capable of imposing this madness on themselves, I will point to France during the French Revolution which abolished slavery in the name of the “Rights of Man” and made every Negro a citizen of the French Republic.

Hunter Wallace

He who wants to venture into why we need a lesson in humility must read Impeachment of Man. In short, much of the evil of our time is due to pride, the primordial sin that modified apes are the crown of evolution when, because of their fruit cake behaviour, they obviously are not.

Read my Day of Wrath and tell me with a straight face that humans are ‘sane’ or ‘superior’. That does not mean that they are a lost cause, as potentially the eternal feminine could lead the white race to the Absolute, as I say in my last essay in The Fair Race (pages 652ff).

Published in: on October 20, 2019 at 1:19 pm  Comments (14)  

Darkening Age, 27

Below, excerpts from the final
chapter of Nixey’s book:

‘Moreover, we forbid the teaching of any doctrine by those who labour under the insanity of paganism’.

– Justinian Code

The philosopher Damascius was a brave man: you had to be to see what he had seen and still be a philosopher. But as he walked through the streets of Athens in AD 529 and heard the new laws bellowed out in the town’s crowded squares, even he must have felt the stirrings of unease. He was a man who had known persecution at the hands of the Christians before. He would have been a fool not to recognize the signs that it was beginning again.

As a young man, Damascius had studied philosophy in Alexandria, the city of the murdered Hypatia. He had not been there for long when the city had turned, once again, on its philosophers. The persecution had begun dramatically. A violent attack on a Christian by some non-Christian students had started a chain of reprisals in which philosophers and pagans were targeted. Christian monks, armed with an axe, had raided, searched then demolished a house accused of being a shrine to ‘demonic’ idols. The violence had spread and Christians had found and collected all images of the old gods from across Alexandria, from the bathhouses and from people’s homes. They had placed them in a pyre in the centre of the city and burned them. As the Christian chronicler, Zachariah of Mytilene, comfortably observed, Christ had declared that he had ‘given you the authority to tread on snakes and scorpions, and over all enemy power’.

For Damascius and his fellow philosophers, however, all that had been a mere prelude to what came next. Soon afterwards, an imperial officer had been sent to Alexandria to investigate paganism. The investigation had rapidly turned to persecution. This was when philosophers had been tortured by being hung up by cords and when Damascius’s own brother had been beaten with cudgels – and to Damascius’s great pride, had remained silent…

Damascius decided to flee. In secret, he hurried with his teacher, Isidore, to the harbour and boarded a boat. Their final destination was Greece, and Athens, the most famous city in the history of Western philosophy.

It was now almost four decades since Damascius had escaped to Athens as an intellectual exile. In that time, a lot had changed. When he had arrived in the city he had been a young man; now he was almost seventy. But he was still as energetic as ever, and as he walked about Athens in his distinctive philosopher’s cloak – the same austere cloak that Hypatia had worn – many of the citizens would have recognized him. For this émigré was now not only an established fixture of Athenian philosophy and a prolific author, he was also the successful head of one of the city’s philosophical schools: the Academy. To say ‘one of’ the schools is to diminish this institution’s importance: it was perhaps the most famous school in Athens, indeed in the entire Roman Empire. It traced its history back almost a thousand years and it would leave its linguistic traces on Europe and America for two thousand years to come. Every modern academy, académie and akademie owes its name it.

Since he had crossed the wine-dark sea, life had gone well for Damascius – astonishingly well, given the turbulence he had left behind. In Alexandria, Christian torture, murder and destruction had had its effect on the intellectual life of the city. After Hypatia’s murder the numbers of philosophers in Alexandria and the quality of what was being taught there had, unsurprisingly, declined rapidly. In the writings of Alexandrian authors there is a clear mood of depression, verging on despair. Many, like Damascius, had left.

In fifth-century Athens, the Church was far less powerful and considerably less aggressive. Its intellectuals had felt pressure nonetheless. Pagan philosophers who flagrantly opposed Christianity paid for their dissent. The city was rife with informers and city officials listened to them. One of Damascius’s predecessors had exasperated the authorities so much that he had fled, escaping – narrowly – with his life and his property. Another philosopher so vexed the city’s Christians by his unrepentant ‘pagan’ ways that he had had to go into exile for a year to get away from the ‘vulture-like men’ who now watched over Athens. In an act that could hardly have been more symbolic of their intellectual intentions, the Christians had built a basilica in the middle of what had once been a library. The Athens that had been so quarrelsome, so gloriously and unrepentantly argumentative, was being silenced. This was an increasingly tense, strained world. It was, as another author and friend of Damascius put it, ‘a time of tyranny and crisis’.

The very fabric of the city had changed. Its pagan festivals had been stopped, its temples closed and, as in Alexandria, the skyline of the city had been desecrated; here, by the removal of Phidias’s great figure of Athena…

Despite his success, Damascius had not forgotten what he had seen in Alexandria – and had not forgiven it, either. His writings show a never-failing contempt for the Christians. He had seen the power of Christian zeal in action. His brother had been tortured by it. His teacher had been exiled by it. And, in the year 529, zealotry was once again in evidence. Christianity had long ago announced that all pagans had been wiped out. Now, finally, reality was to be forced to fall in with the triumphant rhetoric.

The determination that lay behind this threat was not only felt in Athens in this period. It was in AD 529, the very same year in which the atmosphere in Athens began to worsen, that St Benedict destroyed that shrine to Apollo in Monte Cassino…

Previous attacks on Damascius and his scholars had largely been driven by local enthusiasms; a violently aggressive band of Alexandrian monks here, an officious local official there. But this attack was something new. It came not from the enthusiasm of a hostile local power; it came in the form of a law – from the emperor himself…

This was the end. The ‘impious and wicked pagans’ were to be allowed to continue in their ‘insane error’ no longer. Anyone who refused salvation in the next life would, from now on, be all but damned in this one…

This was no longer mere prohibition of other religious practices. It was the active enforcement of Christianity on every single, sinful pagan in the empire. The roads to error were being closed, forcefully. Everyone now had to become Christian. Every single person in the empire who had not yet been baptized now had to come forward immediately, go to the holy churches and ‘entirely abandon the former error [and] receive saving baptism’…

‘Moreover’, it reads, ‘we forbid the teaching of any doctrine by those who labour under the insanity of paganism’ so that they might not ‘corrupt the souls of their disciples.’ The law goes on, adding a finicky detail or two about pay, but largely that is it.

Its consequences were formidable. It was this law that forced Damascius and his followers to leave Athens. It was this law that caused the Academy to close. It was this law that led the English scholar Edward Gibbon to declare that the entirety of the barbarian invasions had been less damaging to Athenian philosophy than Christianity was. This law’s consequences were described more simply by later historians. It was from this moment, they said, that a Dark Age began to descend upon Europe…

Free philosophy has gone. The great destruction of classical texts gathers pace. The writings of the Greeks ‘have all perished and are obliterated’: that was what John Chrysostom had said. He hadn’t been quite right, then: but time would bring greater truth to his boast. Undefended by pagan philosophers or institutions, and disliked by many of the monks who were copying them out, these texts start to disappear. Monasteries start to erase the works of Aristotle, Cicero, Seneca and Archimedes. ‘Heretical’ – and brilliant – ideas crumble into dust. Pliny is scraped from the page. Cicero and Seneca are overwritten. Archimedes is covered over. Every single work of Democritus and his heretical ‘atomism’ vanishes. Ninety per cent of all classical literature fades away…

The pages of history go silent. But the stones of Athens provide a small coda to the story of the seven philosophers… The lovely statue of Athena, the goddess of wisdom, suffered as badly as the statue of Athena in Palmyra had. Not only was she beheaded she was then, a final humiliation, placed face down in the corner of a courtyard to be used as a step. Over the coming years, her back would be worn away as the goddess of wisdom was ground down by generations of Christian feet.

The ‘triumph’ of Christianity was complete.

Vig’s epistle

Hi Cesar,

I wanted to write a comment relating to your post of “MacDonald the lapsed Catholic”, but as usual the text became too long so I decided like last time to mail it to you first. You have my permission to use it for WDH under the name Vig if you want.

Yes, as I said before your site is as far as I know the only site where the core question as to what causes the decline and the looming extinction of the white race or Aryans if you want, is being discussed in a consequent way. Again, this is beyond praise because there is no other way to initiate awareness about it.

Personally I have reached a saturation with the format of blogging and want to move to more practical ways to live up to my insights. What I see as a disadvantage of blogging is that one does not see the face of contributors and that most of them have a short breath as far as tackling the depth of a presented issue. Posting a comment as I saw on other blogs soon descends into a tit for tat of arguments that is more like a mental combat to show tactical superiority instead of slowly carving ones way to the depth of an issue.

Anyway reminding commentators not to digress, is very important.

Inspired by all the posts that I read on WDH the last year I have spiralled my way into an understanding of things that I want to share here. It relates especially to the MacDonald posts and might be interesting for commentators.

I saw two long interviews that Kyle Hunt had with Dr. MacDonald and I have to say that I was not impressed. I am sure that the answer for us will not come through the academic approaches of Dr. MacDonald because he has not wholeheartedly delved into the roots of Christianity.

I demand from every text in this situation that it must be obvious that it comes from a genuine life experience which includes experiences of suffering and does not purely arise out of a speculative philosophising.

My study on the core question has led me to see the connection between a few things.

Inspired by Nietzsche’s remarkable analysis of Socrates I concluded that the fall from grace for the European culture started already around 400 B.C. with the verbal firework of Socrates and Plato, and that these thinkers themselves are just the symptoms of a degeneration of instinctive health of the Greeks of that time. Their culture fell apart and lost its vital centre.

In a psychological sense the dominance that the spoken word had acquired by the values that Socrates and Plato had created, was not compensated by a cultural mechanism that could have kept the balance of the right and the left brain halves, which, as I understand it, is absolutely needed for real creativity to happen.

It is a historical fact that Greek society shortly after this development started to become instable and that its brilliant culture stifled up into Hellenism which was characterized by mannerism and the lack of true innovation.

What the influence of Socrates and Plato indicated was the need for an analytical and rational use of the mind of which the tactical use of speech and the ability of calculation was just an extension. The whole culture of debate in the Greek agora (a public place for “mental duelling”), as was sophistry, was rooted in this.

My insight is that it was not like Socrates and Plato inventing this and the Greeks following them. Especially Plato was just expressing the collective Greek mind because that collective mind needed that aggressive faculty of speech to be able to organise their growing technology, which they needed to win the war against the Persians. Think of the technology you need to build warships and weapons fortifications and temples in a relatively short time. This is really underestimated by all historians because they are academicians who never worked with their hands. This is shown by the fundamental changes these days in the understanding of the pyramid builders. Historians have usually not the slightest understanding of technology and its requirements and therefore a great deal of history has to be rewritten.

The essence of my view is that the very quick development of this faculty (on the level of the collective mind) threw the Greeks off balance and so they lost their creative power.

In the time of Socrates started already the weakening of the instinctive intelligence in favour of an aggressive and philosophising intellect.

Actually it was a neurological instead of a cultural issue. In this process of lateralisation of mental faculties the integration of the soul got lost. The Greeks one could say got stuck in one dimension of their expressive abilities because of the tremendous success of that ability. A contemporary German brain specialist Professor Manfred Spitzer confirms this by saying that the brain reinforces every nervous track every time that one uses it till it becomes a nervous “highway” so to say. The only way to escape out of this is conscious adventurism, but that I am sure is prevented by human laziness.

That white Europeans in the last two thousand years have been so creative in spite of Christ-insanity is only thanks to an inborn and Aryan (genetic as they prefer it these days) devotion to the higher states of mind, which one could define as the essence of aesthetic awareness. But now bleeding themselves hollow in this process of serving Mammon emotional schizophrenia is the result.

They have finally lost this costly thin thread (Das Goldene Band by Miguel Serrano) that connects them to their spiritual dimension as is demonstrated by the degeneration of European contemporary art after WWII, and the absolute collapse of real creativity we can witness in European art.

I don’t equate real creativity with technological smartness here.

The white European as the inventor of science, got “lobotomised” so to say, not being able to express and live his emotional dimension because of his inner distortion that the victory of his beloved science has cost him. Since the end of the 19th century and the ascent of technology the costly thin thread (Das Goldene Band) has been cut off and the desire to live and to reproduce are vanishing as we witness.

Is it not so that white Europeans have lost completely the dimension of celebration and the ability to have festivities of a joyous and emotional nature without the help of alcohol or designer drugs?

What one can measure in PET and MRI scans is that Chinese and Japanese have a much more efficient use of their brain than westerners when they calculate and think. There must be a connection with them using pictograms instead of ideograms as we do in Indo Germanic language.

I have a suspicion that exactly because of this weakening of instinctual health, that means the ability to defend your own interests, in Roman times already, the white Europeans could not resist the mental pestilence that was being spread by Christians and through the backdoor also by Jews. No historian has realised the immense weight that the keeping up of an imperium lays on the rational faculties of a ruling class like the Romans.

Miscegenation of the Romans was an indication of a weakened awareness of one’s own interest, an extreme rational mentality interfering with an autonomous vital biological process which was basically derailed by this aggressive rationality. The Roman pantheon notwithstanding its pagan nature was not really an authentic happening, their real thing was building aquaducts, temples and roads and have standing armies.

As I see it European man did not create a mechanism that would bring back the balance in his mind by keeping conscious connection to emotional and instinctive expressions. This is the basic mechanism that stifles all cultures that don’t renew themselves consciously but keep hanging on to old traumata or mechanisms that were once successful but now fill up their minds and prevent them from experiencing reality.

Our “Institutions” have to go.

Remains to clarify the connection between Christians and Jews and the degeneration as such.

To put it in the simplest and crudest form of explanation: The Aryan, sacrificing his integrity by creating and then by hanging on too long to a frenetic use of science and technology, finally has reached a state of being that is cut of from his spiritual dimension, being emotionally “lobotomised”, that means he does not know what his feelings are and when he knows them he cannot express them authentically.

This makes him depraved, spiritually incapacitated so to say, but he is still longing for the higher states of being. If one listens carefully to the great European thinkers like all the great German philosophers all they are after is the kick of attaining a higher state of mind. One could say that it is a masturbatory activity.

Philosophy is a complete waste of time because it is an illusion that actually separates one from reality. The only one not falling in this category is Nietzsche.

In short the white man has become needy and insecure.

The Jew has because of his circumcision trip landed up in the same boat. Since a few thousand years he has an unnatural mind and his costly thin thread (Das Goldene Band) is also cut off. His depravity is essentially on the instinctive and the heart level but therefore the more potent. At least he has power and money and is emotionally more integrated than the Christian.

His addiction is not philosophy as with the Germans and is therefore also not so serious as the Germans, but his addiction is status and power. That is why his mind is urging him to do business by delivering seductive illusions to the unhappy Christians like Paul of Tarsus was doing. He has created communism, psycho-analysis, all kinds of suddho religions that seems to relieve suffering.

The interaction between Jews and Christians is an involuntary one indeed, and it is not strange that since a few thousand years they have become intertwined in a sort of parasitic symbiosis, rooted in a mutually dependant spiritual depravity. In a very blunt way one could say that this symbiosis is of the nature of the relation between a prostitute and a pimp.

Published in: on June 21, 2019 at 7:45 am  Comments (13)  

The Antichrist § 14

We have changed our minds. We have become more modest in every way. We have stopped deriving humanity from ‘spirit’, from ‘divinity’, we have stuck human beings back among the animals. We see them as the strongest animals because they are the most cunning: one consequence of this is their spirituality. On the other hand, we are also opposed to a certain vanity that re-emerges here too, acting as if human beings were the great hidden goal of animal evolution. Humans are in no way the crown of creation, all beings occupy the same level of perfection…

Christianity’s Criminal History, 112

Editor’s note: Here we see once again some passages on the historical Libanius: a central character in Gore Vidal’s Julian. What Deschner says here about Libanius is splendidly novelized by Vidal in the very final paragraph of his novel.

To contextualise these translations of Karlheinz Deschner’s encyclopaedic history of the Church in 10-volumes, Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums, read the abridged translation of Volume I.
 

The Western world darkens more and more

Culture was highly esteemed in the 4th and 5th centuries. It was one of the legacies of antiquity and enjoyed an ‘almost religious veneration’ (Dannenbauer). Still in the year 360 a law of the emperor Constantius could declare that education was the supreme virtue. And really many noble families of that time, Gallic and Roman, were consecrated to it and particularly in the bosom of the Senatorial proceedings.

But they were already simple custodians of the culture, to which they did not enrich. And everywhere there were circles and social forces of a very different kind, even in the highest positions. The Christian king Theodoric the Great was no longer able to write his own name on the documents: neither could most of the Christian princes. Theodoric wrote the four letters LEGI (‘I read it’) by means of an aureus mold expressly forged for him. The instruction of the Goth children was practically forbidden by him, since, as he seems to have said, he who trembled before the master’s blows would never know how to despise the cuts and rushes of the sword in battle.

In Gaul, apparently, where the school system had flourished from the beginning of the 2nd century until the end of the 4th century, public schools are disappearing over the course of the next century, no matter how much here and there, in Lyon, Vienne, Bordeaux and Clermont there still are schools of grammar and rhetoric in addition to, naturally, the private ones. But all the teachings, at least the literary, served exclusively for the collection of material for sermons and treatises, to deal with the Bible and for the consolidation of the faith. Scientific inquiry was already a thing of the past: it no longer counted or was appreciated. The knowledge of Greek, which for centuries was the requirement of every authentic culture, became a rarity. Even the Roman classics, such as Horace, Ovid and Catullus, were cited less and less.

Libanius, the champion of Hellenistic culture, the most famous professor of rhetoric of the century, complains about the aversion aroused by that profession. ‘They see’, he says, referring to his students, ‘that this cause is despised and thrown on the floor; that does not bring fame, power or wealth but a painful servitude under many lords, parents, mothers, pedagogues and other students, who put things upside down and believe that it is the teacher who needs them. When they see all this they avoid this depreciated profession like a boat the pitfalls’.

In the time of Augustine there are hardly any schools of philosophy in the West. Philosophy is frowned upon, it is a thing of the devil, the original father of all ‘heresy’, and it causes fear to the pious. Even in a centre of culture as important as Bordeaux philosophy is no longer taught. And even in the East, the largest and most important of the universities of the Roman Empire, that of Constantinople, has only one chair of philosophy out of a total of 31.

The knowledge of something that had existed for a long time was lost in almost all areas. The spiritual horizon became increasingly narrower. Ancient culture languished from Gaul to Africa, while in Italy it practically disappeared. The interest in natural science vanished. Also jurisprudence, at least in the West, suffers ‘havoc’, an ‘astonishing demolition’ (Wieacker).

The bishop Paulinus of Nola, who died in 431, never read a historian: a typical attitude of the moment. Whole eras fall in the oblivion, for example, the time of the Roman emperors. The only renowned historian in the late 4th century is Ammianus Marcellinus, a non-Christian. Entire synods forbid the bishops to read ‘pagan’ books. In short: scientific research ceases; experimental testing stops; people think increasingly with less autonomy.

A few decades later no doctor could heal Bishop Gregory de Tours, a man with a mind full of superstitions, but he could miraculously be healed through a drink of water with some dust taken from the tomb of St. Martin.

Only clerics will still read.

The Antichrist § 12

If you stop and think that among almost all peoples the philosopher is just a further development of the priestly type, then this legacy of the priests, the art of falling for your own forgeries, will not seem particularly surprising.

Published in: on October 16, 2018 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  

The Antichrist § 11

One more word against Kant as a moralist. ‘Virtue’, ‘duty’, ‘goodness in itself’, goodness that has been stamped with the character of the impersonal and the universally valid—these are all chimeras, and expression of decay, of the final exhaustion of life, of the Königsberg Chineseanity.

A people is destroyed when it confuses its own duty with the concept of duty in general…

Kant became an idiot. — And such a man was the contemporary of Goethe! This disaster of a spider passed for the German philosopher — and still does!

Published in: on September 26, 2018 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  

The Antichrist § 10

Germans understand me immediately when I say that philosophy has been corrupted by theologian blood…

What German philosophy really is—an underhanded theology…

Why were Germans so convinced that Kant marked a change for the better? The theologian instinct of the German scholar had guessed just what was possible again: a hidden path to the old ideal lay open…

Kant’s success is just a theologian success: Kant, like Luther, like Leibniz, was one more drag on an already precarious German sense of integrity —

Published in: on August 27, 2018 at 9:13 pm  Comments (5)  

The Antichrist § 8

 

We need to say whom we feel opposed to—theologians and everything with theologian blood in its veins—the whole of our philosophy…

Published in: on August 5, 2018 at 2:44 pm  Comments Off on The Antichrist § 8  

The Story of Philosophy, 8

Aristotle and Greek science

 

Under Plato he studied eight—or twenty—years; and indeed the pervasive Platonism of Aristotle’s speculations, even of those most anti-Platonic, suggests the longer period. One would like to imagine these as very happy years: a brilliant pupil guided by an incomparable teacher, walking like Greek lovers in the gardens of philosophy. But they were both geniuses; and it is notorious that geniuses accord with one another as harmoniously as dynamite with fire. Almost half a century separated them; it was difficult for understanding to bridge the gap of years and cancel the incompatibility of souls.

On the same page Durant adds that Aristotle

was the first, after Euripides, to gather together a library; and the foundation of the principles of library classification was among his many contributions to scholarship. Therefore Plato spoke of Aristotle’s home as “the house of the reader, ” and seems to have meant the sincerest compliment; but some ancient gossip will have it that the Master intended a sly but vigorous dig at a certain book-wormishness in Aristotle.

After an unquoted paragraph Durant writes:

The other incidents of this Athenian period are still more problematical. Some biographers tell us that Aristotle founded a school of oratory to rival Isocrates; and that he had among his pupils in this school the wealthy Hermias, who was soon to become aristocrat of the city-state of Atarneus. After reaching this elevation Hermias invited Aristotle to his court; and in the year 344 b.c. he rewarded his teacher for past favours by bestowing upon him a sister (or a niece) in marriage. One might suspect this as a Greek gift; but the historians hasten to assure us that Aristotle, despite his genius, lived happily enough with his wife, and spoke of her most affectionately in his will. It was just a year later that Philip, King of Macedon, called Aristotle to the court at Pella to undertake the education of Alexander. It bespeaks the rising repute of our philosopher that the greatest monarch of the time, looking about for the greatest teacher, should single out Aristotle to be the tutor of the future master of the world.

You can imagine treating white women like barter today? But it was healthier than Western feminism.

Philip had no sympathy with the individualism that had fostered the art and intellect of Greece but had at the same time disintegrated her social order; in all these little capitals he saw not the exhilarating culture and the unsurpassable art, but the commercial corruption and the political chaos; he saw insatiable merchants and bankers absorbing the vital resources of the nation, incompetent politicians and clever orators misleading a busy populace into disastrous plots and wars, factions cleaving classes and classes congealing into castes: this, said Philip, was not a nation but only a welter of individuals—geniuses and slaves; he would bring the hand of order down upon this turmoil, and make all Greece stand up united and strong as the political centre and basis of the world. In his youth in Thebes he had learned the arts of military strategy and civil organization under the noble Epaminondas; and now, with courage as boundless as his ambition, he bettered the instruction. In 338 b.c. he defeated the Athenians at Chaeronea, and saw at last a Greece united, though with chains. And then, as he stood upon this victory, and planned how he and his son should master and unify the world, he fell under an assassin’s hand.

Durant ignored what I know about psychoclasses: different levels of childrearing from the point of view of empathy toward the child. It is disturbing to read, for example, that according to Plutarch, Olympias, Philip’s wife and the mother of Alexander, was a devout member of the orgiastic snake-worshiping cult of Dionysus. Plutarch even suggests that she slept with snakes in her bed. Although Oliver Stone’s film of Alexander is Hollywood, not a real biography, the first part of the film up to the assassination of Philip is not that bad as to provide an idea of the unhealthy relationship between Olympias and her son.

“For a while,” says Plutarch, “Alexander loved and cherished Aristotle no less than as if he had been his own father; saying that though he had received life from the one, the other had taught him the art of living.” (“Life,” says a fine Greek adage, “is the gift of nature; but beautiful living is the gift of wisdom.”)

But was it wisdom? The real ‘wisdom of the West’ only started with a politician like Hitler and, on the other side of the Atlantic, a white supremacist like Pierce. Ancient philosophers ignored the dangers involved in conquering non-white nations without the policy extermination or expulsion.

Published in: on May 17, 2018 at 1:07 pm  Comments (6)