Post-1950s décadents

In yesterday’s interview of Richard Spencer by JFG the audience asked Spencer, ‘Name some red-pill kids movies’ and Spencer mentioned a silly Disney film produced after the Jews had acquired Walt’s company.

Spencer’s response corroborated my observation that some pro-white Americans younger than me are alienated from their heritage. I watched many healthy American films on the big screen in the 1960s. They have not because they were not born.

As to the seventh art JFG is worse than Spencer. In other podcasts he reviewed The Godfather (filmed in 1972, the decade when the healthy movies fell out of fashion). Although I have not watched that JFG video, I doubt he said something akin to what I said about the Sicilian scum that plagued Nordish America. JFG and many white nationalists are also fans of a degenerate movie. In a 2012 a post I said:

Last January, in his [Counter-Currents] review of Fight Club Costello wanted us to believe that a film that starts with rock music, based upon a nihilistic novel authored by a homosexual author, Chuck Palahniuk, when properly interpreted it deals with rebellious, healthy fascist moods that could lead our young toward masculine identity.

The post got 41 comments and it still shocks me that people in the Alt-Right love this 1999 Hollywood trash produced by the subversive tribe. But as I said yesterday JFG is a degenerate.

As to Spencer, instead of recommending a movie filmed after the Jewish takeover of the Disney company, he could have recommended a healthy film for kids when Walt was still with us. (I remember so well the day Walt Disney died: precisely I went with my little sisters and cousins to watch a movie for kids when my blond cousin gave me the bad news.) A non-décadent man could have recommended Disney’s Sleeping Beauty, where the beauty of the white Aryan woman is introduced to a very young public with the music of Tchaikovsky and the background pictorial art of Eyvind Earle.

If I was asked which non-animated movie conveyed an inspiring message for American kids, I would have recommended Shane, also filmed in the 1950s. As an old reviewer put it, ‘it also contains a very wonderful understanding of the spirit of a little boy amid all the tensions and excitements and adventures of a frontier home’.